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How I think pass blocking should work.

This is how I think pass blocking should work in Madden 20. Keep in mind that this is my solution to making the game simulate football well without it being perfect or the exact same as it would work in real life. The following is a rule set that will allow for the goal of being challenging and fair:

Offensive lineman will block all down lineman for a combined average of 2.8 seconds, which is roughly the average time to make a throw in the NFL. After 2.8 seconds, any pass rushing down lineman will have an opportunity for a block shed. Exception: X-Factors like Myles Garrett (I'm assuming here) will have abilities to get to the QB quicker than that or to pressure the QB while being blocked.

For example, if you play a 4-3 defensive base, one of your lineman may get a block shed right at 2.8 seconds, but not before that. After 2.8 seconds, ratings of the defensive lineman versus the blocking offensive lineman are calculated to determine if a block shed has occurred. If a defensive lineman is double teamed, this will have an impact resulting in less chance of a block shed. So leaving a back or a tightend to block could have a positive impact.

However, having extra blockers like a back or a tight end, may not result in preventing all block sheds and one of the down lineman (particularly the ones that are not double teamed) could still break through after 2.8 seconds. This is to prevent players from arbitrarily using max protection for the entire game allowing them to abuse the AI by getting an abnormal amount of time to throw the ball deep on corners and crossing routes that they "know" will be open given enough time.

This also creates a situation where running 4-3 or 5-2 defensive formations has a more efficient and consistent benefit in the pass rush verses formations with less defensive lineman.

Sending additional players on a blitz or bluff blitzing has the potential to confuse the offensive line. Any additional players rushing the QB that are not the down lineman could be free rushers (arriving quicker than 2.8 seconds). The counter for this is to leave a back or a tightend to block, properly ID the mike, or properly slide the line. Failure to do one of these things will result in a free rusher going straight to the QB. Success results in blocking for at least 2.8 seconds per the rules listed above).

Using this rule set, the fewer down lineman the better the potential pass rush. However, the counter to this is the fewer the down lineman the less effective you'll be at stopping the run. As offensive lineman that run block versus non-defensive lineman will get bonuses to their blocking ability that will often result in near automatic wins.

This means that running Dollar on 1st and 10 may not be a wise decision, because of the likelihood of your opponent audibling to a run and picking up very easy yardage. However running Dollar on 3rd and 17 might be smart, as it will be difficult to figure out where the blitz is coming from, resulting in intense pressure on the QB.

Lastly, there a special instances where the 2.8 second rule should not apply:
When the defense is in pass commit and the offense runs a play action pass. This should allow for quicker block shedding by all defensive lineman. Of course if the offensive play were a run, any player rushing the passer would be unlikely to get a block shed at all.

The counter for this would be screen passes and draws. So if the defense is pass commit and the offense instead runs a draw or a screen pass, the defensive lineman should ignore everything but the QB. Meaning that screen passes should pop wide open and draw plays should result in defensive lineman being blocked by offensive lineman. Also, players in man coverage would be less aware of a running play (or play-action) and would be likely to continue to follow their assigned man down the field (if in pass commit).


Replies

  • You must didn't play beta lol
  • This is not a bad idea but a couple of things:

    (1) You need to account for blockers who are above average (or below average.) Jason Peters should be holding his blocks a bit longer than a 5th round rookie

    (2) The 2.8 seconds has to be applied across the board. That means the receivers should already be at the top of this route or whatever. We've seen where the animation takes over and things are out of whack.

    But all I really want is the ability pick where my double team blocking occur. Especially with X Factor... if Aaron Donald is going to be a beast (and that's ok... I want the elite players to play like elite players) I would like ways to counter that. So far... all I can do is leave a TE or RB in to block.
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