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You guys are misunderstanding this whole beta thing

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  • Sinbin
    1331 posts Member
    Juppo1996 wrote: »
    VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    CDBently80 wrote: »
    Sinbin wrote: »
    Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    LOL

    What other games need betas to figure out major game breaking issues? Most of the betas that are out there are the devs and close people to development team testing out bugs, glitches, connectivity issues.

    It's not the job of the consumer to fix the game. To say what you are saying is that the game cannot be successful without user feedback from a beta. Bull crap. They're adults, programmers, hockey fans.... it's not that difficult

    Almost every game released gets some form of closed/open public beta. They rely on the consumer because if it were up to developers to make their game, it would be vastly different. One you would probably hate more because they'd want it to be more sim and more hardcore. The fact is that most people can't handle that kind of game because it's more frustrating than fun for them. Not taking consumer feedback is a HUGE mistake.

    If it wasn't that difficult, you'd see a ton of hockey games on the market. I'd love to see all the people here that think it's not that difficult to make a hockey game actually make one. You guys keep asking for someone else to make one. Do it yourselves if it's so easy.

    No offense, but that's just not accurate! The reason you don't see a ton of hockey games on the market comes down to MONEY! And let me clarify- MONEY TO BE MADE! There is no money in NHL games or you would see such developers like 2k sports throwing their hat into the mix. It became clear after NHL 14's HUT when they eliminated the companion app for HUT and then nerfed the auction menus of HUT (which meant the only way to build a competitive team was to buy HUT packs online). That's example number one. Another person in this thread listed a slew of issues that I also agree on. One major issue is the Defensive AI with the puck behind the net. They just skate into the back of the net which is beyond ridiculous and not even remotely acceptable, but yet it has remained in all the games since last Gen for god sakes! The list of untouched issues goes on and on as well as arguments over the direction of certain modes (ahem EASHL). I often find myself imagining what the EA sports NHL office must look like. I envision one developer (possibly another intern-POSSIBLY) in a room the size of a janitor closet with a single flickering light bulb over his run down desk and 10 year old computer. On the outside of the door is a crooked sign that has pealed paint and dirt crusted to it that says EA Sports NHL Office. OOh don't forget about that developers pet rat that he feeds at lunch everyday! Listen, all jokes aside (and my smart a$$ comments) NHL will never compete with the likes of Fifa, Madden, NBA or MLB! Jeeze I bet even Nascar brings in more income! So with that said its like any other business model applied by all corporations today. Invest the least amount of resources and maximize profit! I give you NHL fans, HUT!

    But there are other small dev teams out there making games. Take the F1 team at Codemasters. For a long time, their product struggled, until they realised that an Formula One game is basically a NICHE product that caters to a very narrow group of people. If you try to "dumb it down", not only do you alienate the core fans (who are mostly hard core Formula One fanatics) but you don't really generate any "new" sales. So after a few seasons of putting a shoddy product in store shelves (and online stores), they went 180 and started to listen to the hardcore crowd and actually worked on the foundations of the game; what makes a Formula One racing game a FORMULA ONE RACING GAME. Everything was overhauled, the physics, the controls, the presentation. Everything was made to feel more like a racing game where you are a formula one driver.

    They didn't cater to the kids who wanted rocket boost racing or bumper cars. They build their game from the ground up a s a hard core simulation, with the OPTION to tone things down to your level if you like. Last year's game sold about the same numbers as NHL 17 did, and that's fine. Because they understand they are making a niche game, for a niche market.

    The difference is that Codemasters is committed to cater to their hardcore audience first and foremost because they understand what makes an F1 game an F1 game.

    They didn't put in a 4 cars on the track mode. They didn't dumb down the physics. They didn't boost the speed of the game to make it "feel" faster. Everything in their game is Authentic. There is no other F1 game on the market. So the little kids who find it boring, well they can go play Mario Kart or they can play Call of Duty of whatever arcade game they want to play.

    The devs know they can't afford to lose their hard core fans and it shows in their product and in the support they get from their HAPPY fans.

    This is a great point. Talking about Codies, they also managed to revive the DiRT franchise by going sim and pleasing the hardcore group. The best marketing a video game can get is a positive buzz from the community and that always starts with the hardcore group being happy about the game. It keeps the game on the top seller/most played charts, and gets the game exposure online.

    The thing that's different in racing games and sports games is that with racing games, I always have another game where I can get my simracing fix if the licensed F1 game doesn't provide it so they actually have to worry about completely loosing the hardcore group. EA doesn't really have this problem since there isn't any competition where the hardcore group could jump ship and they know this. The hardcore fans of NHL games are the type of people who just want to play something hockey related and will continue to do so even if the product is terrible.

    The "hardcore" crowd thinks this game is too much of a sim as it is. The vast majority of you are asking for the skating from pre-TPS days where the limitations of the human body weren't so adhered to. The "hardcore" crowd wants a more arcade style of skating where everyone is fast, passes and shoots perfectly, can do any deke no matter the build and never gets tired. They want a more unrealistic game so the idea a hardcore game is going to get everyone to switch most likely wouldn't be true.

    Dirt also has multiple years between releases. It took, what, 4 years for DIRT 4 to release? That doesn't happen with annual sports games.
  • You guys also have to realize that they cannot make this game super realistic. I can't remember where I saw this, but in an interview with Rammer, he said that they tried to make sticks 100% solid, but the game slowed down and was way too clunky, thats why pucks sometimes pass through sticks

    You are right about that
    EA SPORTS Challenge Series Finalist - Nobounds

  • Sinbin wrote: »
    Juppo1996 wrote: »
    VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    CDBently80 wrote: »
    Sinbin wrote: »
    Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    LOL

    What other games need betas to figure out major game breaking issues? Most of the betas that are out there are the devs and close people to development team testing out bugs, glitches, connectivity issues.

    It's not the job of the consumer to fix the game. To say what you are saying is that the game cannot be successful without user feedback from a beta. Bull crap. They're adults, programmers, hockey fans.... it's not that difficult

    Almost every game released gets some form of closed/open public beta. They rely on the consumer because if it were up to developers to make their game, it would be vastly different. One you would probably hate more because they'd want it to be more sim and more hardcore. The fact is that most people can't handle that kind of game because it's more frustrating than fun for them. Not taking consumer feedback is a HUGE mistake.

    If it wasn't that difficult, you'd see a ton of hockey games on the market. I'd love to see all the people here that think it's not that difficult to make a hockey game actually make one. You guys keep asking for someone else to make one. Do it yourselves if it's so easy.

    No offense, but that's just not accurate! The reason you don't see a ton of hockey games on the market comes down to MONEY! And let me clarify- MONEY TO BE MADE! There is no money in NHL games or you would see such developers like 2k sports throwing their hat into the mix. It became clear after NHL 14's HUT when they eliminated the companion app for HUT and then nerfed the auction menus of HUT (which meant the only way to build a competitive team was to buy HUT packs online). That's example number one. Another person in this thread listed a slew of issues that I also agree on. One major issue is the Defensive AI with the puck behind the net. They just skate into the back of the net which is beyond ridiculous and not even remotely acceptable, but yet it has remained in all the games since last Gen for god sakes! The list of untouched issues goes on and on as well as arguments over the direction of certain modes (ahem EASHL). I often find myself imagining what the EA sports NHL office must look like. I envision one developer (possibly another intern-POSSIBLY) in a room the size of a janitor closet with a single flickering light bulb over his run down desk and 10 year old computer. On the outside of the door is a crooked sign that has pealed paint and dirt crusted to it that says EA Sports NHL Office. OOh don't forget about that developers pet rat that he feeds at lunch everyday! Listen, all jokes aside (and my smart a$$ comments) NHL will never compete with the likes of Fifa, Madden, NBA or MLB! Jeeze I bet even Nascar brings in more income! So with that said its like any other business model applied by all corporations today. Invest the least amount of resources and maximize profit! I give you NHL fans, HUT!

    But there are other small dev teams out there making games. Take the F1 team at Codemasters. For a long time, their product struggled, until they realised that an Formula One game is basically a NICHE product that caters to a very narrow group of people. If you try to "dumb it down", not only do you alienate the core fans (who are mostly hard core Formula One fanatics) but you don't really generate any "new" sales. So after a few seasons of putting a shoddy product in store shelves (and online stores), they went 180 and started to listen to the hardcore crowd and actually worked on the foundations of the game; what makes a Formula One racing game a FORMULA ONE RACING GAME. Everything was overhauled, the physics, the controls, the presentation. Everything was made to feel more like a racing game where you are a formula one driver.

    They didn't cater to the kids who wanted rocket boost racing or bumper cars. They build their game from the ground up a s a hard core simulation, with the OPTION to tone things down to your level if you like. Last year's game sold about the same numbers as NHL 17 did, and that's fine. Because they understand they are making a niche game, for a niche market.

    The difference is that Codemasters is committed to cater to their hardcore audience first and foremost because they understand what makes an F1 game an F1 game.

    They didn't put in a 4 cars on the track mode. They didn't dumb down the physics. They didn't boost the speed of the game to make it "feel" faster. Everything in their game is Authentic. There is no other F1 game on the market. So the little kids who find it boring, well they can go play Mario Kart or they can play Call of Duty of whatever arcade game they want to play.

    The devs know they can't afford to lose their hard core fans and it shows in their product and in the support they get from their HAPPY fans.

    This is a great point. Talking about Codies, they also managed to revive the DiRT franchise by going sim and pleasing the hardcore group. The best marketing a video game can get is a positive buzz from the community and that always starts with the hardcore group being happy about the game. It keeps the game on the top seller/most played charts, and gets the game exposure online.

    The thing that's different in racing games and sports games is that with racing games, I always have another game where I can get my simracing fix if the licensed F1 game doesn't provide it so they actually have to worry about completely loosing the hardcore group. EA doesn't really have this problem since there isn't any competition where the hardcore group could jump ship and they know this. The hardcore fans of NHL games are the type of people who just want to play something hockey related and will continue to do so even if the product is terrible.

    The "hardcore" crowd thinks this game is too much of a sim as it is. The vast majority of you are asking for the skating from pre-TPS days where the limitations of the human body weren't so adhered to. The "hardcore" crowd wants a more arcade style of skating where everyone is fast, passes and shoots perfectly, can do any deke no matter the build and never gets tired. They want a more unrealistic game so the idea a hardcore game is going to get everyone to switch most likely wouldn't be true.

    Dirt also has multiple years between releases. It took, what, 4 years for DIRT 4 to release? That doesn't happen with annual sports games.

    That part of the hardcore crowd doesn't know what they want. Those people seem to be frustrated with TPS going nowhere and the fact that it's still an underdeveloped buggy mess causing most of the game's problems. I'm certain that if EA would release a game where it actually worked but still stayed within the limitations of the human body, people here would be all over it. At this point that seems highly unlikely so they would rather have the floaty skating that worked, and I understand that.

    To be honest, NHL doesn't even need to go absolute hardcore 'sim' since I'm not sure if that's even possible in the same sense as a racing sim or a flight sim. With NHL it's more of a question of being consistent with physics and the game looking like a believable representation of hockey on all skill levels. At the moment the better the players are, the less the game actually looks like hockey because of all the exploits in the skating and physics which have become completely acceptable to use. It's baffling to me that some of the people I play 6's with doesn't even consider the 'curling away from a hit' an exploit, it has become so common that it's a legit way to play the game.

    If EA actually took a year to just focus on the skating and the physics it would be a huge leap towards a better game. If they'd work to get rid of the glide bubbles, fix the pivoting and slow speed movement off the puck, get the puck pickups to an acceptable level and fix the hitting and players bouncing off of each other it would already make for a good game.

    There was three years between Dirt: Showdown and Dirt Rally. Dirt Rally is the sim i was talking about, they managed to screw it up with Dirt 4 already but at least we got one proper rally sim, that seems to be a once in a decade type of thing. I only brought that up as another example of going sim but Venom's point about the F1 series still stands. F1 games are annual as well.
  • Juppo1996 wrote: »
    Sinbin wrote: »
    Juppo1996 wrote: »
    VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    CDBently80 wrote: »
    Sinbin wrote: »
    Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    LOL

    What other games need betas to figure out major game breaking issues? Most of the betas that are out there are the devs and close people to development team testing out bugs, glitches, connectivity issues.

    It's not the job of the consumer to fix the game. To say what you are saying is that the game cannot be successful without user feedback from a beta. Bull crap. They're adults, programmers, hockey fans.... it's not that difficult

    Almost every game released gets some form of closed/open public beta. They rely on the consumer because if it were up to developers to make their game, it would be vastly different. One you would probably hate more because they'd want it to be more sim and more hardcore. The fact is that most people can't handle that kind of game because it's more frustrating than fun for them. Not taking consumer feedback is a HUGE mistake.

    If it wasn't that difficult, you'd see a ton of hockey games on the market. I'd love to see all the people here that think it's not that difficult to make a hockey game actually make one. You guys keep asking for someone else to make one. Do it yourselves if it's so easy.

    No offense, but that's just not accurate! The reason you don't see a ton of hockey games on the market comes down to MONEY! And let me clarify- MONEY TO BE MADE! There is no money in NHL games or you would see such developers like 2k sports throwing their hat into the mix. It became clear after NHL 14's HUT when they eliminated the companion app for HUT and then nerfed the auction menus of HUT (which meant the only way to build a competitive team was to buy HUT packs online). That's example number one. Another person in this thread listed a slew of issues that I also agree on. One major issue is the Defensive AI with the puck behind the net. They just skate into the back of the net which is beyond ridiculous and not even remotely acceptable, but yet it has remained in all the games since last Gen for god sakes! The list of untouched issues goes on and on as well as arguments over the direction of certain modes (ahem EASHL). I often find myself imagining what the EA sports NHL office must look like. I envision one developer (possibly another intern-POSSIBLY) in a room the size of a janitor closet with a single flickering light bulb over his run down desk and 10 year old computer. On the outside of the door is a crooked sign that has pealed paint and dirt crusted to it that says EA Sports NHL Office. OOh don't forget about that developers pet rat that he feeds at lunch everyday! Listen, all jokes aside (and my smart a$$ comments) NHL will never compete with the likes of Fifa, Madden, NBA or MLB! Jeeze I bet even Nascar brings in more income! So with that said its like any other business model applied by all corporations today. Invest the least amount of resources and maximize profit! I give you NHL fans, HUT!

    But there are other small dev teams out there making games. Take the F1 team at Codemasters. For a long time, their product struggled, until they realised that an Formula One game is basically a NICHE product that caters to a very narrow group of people. If you try to "dumb it down", not only do you alienate the core fans (who are mostly hard core Formula One fanatics) but you don't really generate any "new" sales. So after a few seasons of putting a shoddy product in store shelves (and online stores), they went 180 and started to listen to the hardcore crowd and actually worked on the foundations of the game; what makes a Formula One racing game a FORMULA ONE RACING GAME. Everything was overhauled, the physics, the controls, the presentation. Everything was made to feel more like a racing game where you are a formula one driver.

    They didn't cater to the kids who wanted rocket boost racing or bumper cars. They build their game from the ground up a s a hard core simulation, with the OPTION to tone things down to your level if you like. Last year's game sold about the same numbers as NHL 17 did, and that's fine. Because they understand they are making a niche game, for a niche market.

    The difference is that Codemasters is committed to cater to their hardcore audience first and foremost because they understand what makes an F1 game an F1 game.

    They didn't put in a 4 cars on the track mode. They didn't dumb down the physics. They didn't boost the speed of the game to make it "feel" faster. Everything in their game is Authentic. There is no other F1 game on the market. So the little kids who find it boring, well they can go play Mario Kart or they can play Call of Duty of whatever arcade game they want to play.

    The devs know they can't afford to lose their hard core fans and it shows in their product and in the support they get from their HAPPY fans.

    This is a great point. Talking about Codies, they also managed to revive the DiRT franchise by going sim and pleasing the hardcore group. The best marketing a video game can get is a positive buzz from the community and that always starts with the hardcore group being happy about the game. It keeps the game on the top seller/most played charts, and gets the game exposure online.

    The thing that's different in racing games and sports games is that with racing games, I always have another game where I can get my simracing fix if the licensed F1 game doesn't provide it so they actually have to worry about completely loosing the hardcore group. EA doesn't really have this problem since there isn't any competition where the hardcore group could jump ship and they know this. The hardcore fans of NHL games are the type of people who just want to play something hockey related and will continue to do so even if the product is terrible.

    The "hardcore" crowd thinks this game is too much of a sim as it is. The vast majority of you are asking for the skating from pre-TPS days where the limitations of the human body weren't so adhered to. The "hardcore" crowd wants a more arcade style of skating where everyone is fast, passes and shoots perfectly, can do any deke no matter the build and never gets tired. They want a more unrealistic game so the idea a hardcore game is going to get everyone to switch most likely wouldn't be true.

    Dirt also has multiple years between releases. It took, what, 4 years for DIRT 4 to release? That doesn't happen with annual sports games.

    That part of the hardcore crowd doesn't know what they want. Those people seem to be frustrated with TPS going nowhere and the fact that it's still an underdeveloped buggy mess causing most of the game's problems. I'm certain that if EA would release a game where it actually worked but still stayed within the limitations of the human body, people here would be all over it. At this point that seems highly unlikely so they would rather have the floaty skating that worked, and I understand that.

    To be honest, NHL doesn't even need to go absolute hardcore 'sim' since I'm not sure if that's even possible in the same sense as a racing sim or a flight sim. With NHL it's more of a question of being consistent with physics and the game looking like a believable representation of hockey on all skill levels. At the moment the better the players are, the less the game actually looks like hockey because of all the exploits in the skating and physics which have become completely acceptable to use. It's baffling to me that some of the people I play 6's with doesn't even consider the 'curling away from a hit' an exploit, it has become so common that it's a legit way to play the game.

    If EA actually took a year to just focus on the skating and the physics it would be a huge leap towards a better game. If they'd work to get rid of the glide bubbles, fix the pivoting and slow speed movement off the puck, get the puck pickups to an acceptable level and fix the hitting and players bouncing off of each other it would already make for a good game.

    There was three years between Dirt: Showdown and Dirt Rally. Dirt Rally is the sim i was talking about, they managed to screw it up with Dirt 4 already but at least we got one proper rally sim, that seems to be a once in a decade type of thing. I only brought that up as another example of going sim but Venom's point about the F1 series still stands. F1 games are annual as well.

    What about the WRC video games? I thought everyone was raving about those last year.

    I think the challanges for racing games as opposed to contact/team sports are much different from each other. For racing games, things like mimicking vehicle performance (dont forget the handling model) and capturing the authenticity of the variances of different race tracks are key to making a good game. Truly the most realistic racer ever would be able to capture the differences in track temperatures based on the real world weather tendencies and reflect that in a different feeling of "grip and tire wear" for each track. That's a long way away for us though. One could argue that in this day and age of online gaming, strong AI is not as important in racing racing games as it once was (perhaps the 7th most important thing to take care of when making a racing game) , leading to AI that never seems quite right in all modern racing games across the board.

    For contact/team sports though, the most important thing is tied for both the game mechanics as well as differences you could feel across the board from strong teams to weak ones. In team sports, the AI is way more important than it is in modern racing games (should be 2nd most important imo) , being as the player will surely interact with AI opponents and teammates at some point.
  • VeNOM2099
    3178 posts Member

    What about the WRC video games? I thought everyone was raving about those last year.

    I think the challanges for racing games as opposed to contact/team sports are much different from each other. For racing games, things like mimicking vehicle performance (dont forget the handling model) and capturing the authenticity of the variances of different race tracks are key to making a good game. Truly the most realistic racer ever would be able to capture the differences in track temperatures based on the real world weather tendencies and reflect that in a different feeling of "grip and tire wear" for each track. That's a long way away for us though. One could argue that in this day and age of online gaming, strong AI is not as important in racing racing games as it once was (perhaps the 7th most important thing to take care of when making a racing game) , leading to AI that never seems quite right in all modern racing games across the board.

    For contact/team sports though, the most important thing is tied for both the game mechanics as well as differences you could feel across the board from strong teams to weak ones. In team sports, the AI is way more important than it is in modern racing games (should be 2nd most important imo) , being as the player will surely interact with AI opponents and teammates at some point.

    It receive luke warm reviews from the Media. And it was sort of an in between sim and arcade racing game, so the hard core didn't really have much to sink their teeth into (poor car selection, not many tracks, by the books handling, etc).

    As for Codemaster's Formula One, the amount of detail that goes into the game is simply astounding. Each car has their own performance and handling, with about two dozen different settings you can manipulate to CHANGE all that to better suite your driving style. There's the different tracks, each with their own attributes from adherence (how much tyres stick to the tarmac) to abrasiveness (how fast the tyres use up). They'll have different temperatures at different spots of the track. When it rains, pools of water will form in place where the track has "divots" that you have to avoid as they can dramatically change the handling of your car if you run over them. Then there's the AI, which the game has to control 21 of them. All of them with different tendencies and level of skill. And they all have to be aware of each other, the track, the weather, their own car.

    And i'm only scratching the surface of the complexity of this game. But Codemasters was able to do it even though EA makes a CRAPLOADS more money than Codies does. Also, the revenue on their F1 game, due to the astronomical cost of getting the F1 license compared to EA having the NHL license is much smaller I bet.

    Again, the difference here is that Codemasters and their Devs care about Formula One. EA doesn't care about Hockey, although I'm certain the Devs do care about the sport, just their hands are tied by the suits.
  • Sgt_Kelso
    1325 posts Member
    edited August 2017
    yeah, it should be a good year for racing, what with F1 2017, Project Cars 2 and Grand Tourismo 7... I will probably get at least two of those, if not all three. Which will eat a big chunk of my NHL time.
  • VeNOM2099
    3178 posts Member
    Same here. LG took up a lot of my gaming time this last year. I finally got some time during the last LG season to go back to F1 2016, but there's just so many things to deal with in this game! I was finally able to finish my first Grand Prix last week!! It's the first time I was able to go from start to finish in an F1 game since F1 2013. :p

    I started 9th in Australia, I finished the race in 5th under heavy rain, about 18 sec. away from my rival (my teammate Felipe Massa). There were two major crashes during the race, one in dry conditions, where I had to drive under a Safety Car. It was AWESOME!!

    This weekend I'm going to start the practice sessions in Bahrain. I have everything set for max realism, full practice/qualifying sessions, 100% laps, parc fermé rules. The whole nine yards.

    It really feels like I'm driving in the F1 circuit (although I wish I had a steering wheel to make it even more immersive).

  • You guys should try Assetto Corsa. That game is absolutely awesome. The best racing/ driving game I ever played.

    Got over 600 hours with the game on Steam already and still not getting bored :)
  • You guys should try Assetto Corsa. That game is absolutely awesome. The best racing/ driving game I ever played.

    Got over 600 hours with the game on Steam already and still not getting bored :)

    I've heard many claim rFactor (or was it rFactor2?) To be vastly superior to Assetto Corsa....but if i hear one person tell be iRacing is superior because of great multiplayer again i'll explode

    The thing with these racing simulators is something feels off about almost all of them. Whether it's the weather affects not affecting your driving enough, or the AI is braindead (see Project Cars 1, where AI drivers will plow through you as if you don't exist, and lapped cars never give you space to pass, only other AI drivers)

    I've all but given up on racing similators at this point due to those issues. I just wish F1 video game didn't mimic real life so well though, as the current state of F1 is litteraly only 2 teams out of 11 teams having a chance to win, and everyone else just doing hot laps and receiving participation ribbons LOL You know it's bad when the top 4 finishers are within 10 seconds 1st place, and then 5th place is over 1:30 minutes behind 1st.
  • djneohockey
    732 posts Member
    edited August 2017
    I think rFactors might have even very slightly more realistic physics and ffb than AC. It's just that the game is so bad visually that it destroy all the immersion for ME.
    If you are only online player then iRacing would be probably your choice.
    I just need all, great physics (realism), great production value (graphics and sounds) and solid online functionality. That's why I spent most of the time in AC at the end.

    And btw., all these games a way better choices than Forza, Pcars or any of these so called AAA titles (played and loved them all too).

    They care more about the marketing and revenues than their product and it shows. Just like our beloved NHL game unfortunately.
  • bryta47
    373 posts Member
    edited August 2017
    Dirt 4 + Project Cars 2 - NHL 18 = fun

    That's science.
  • Great to see there's people interested in racing sims here. I haven't been iRacing in a while now due to the cost so I've been playing a lot of rFactor 2 and 1. Both are still amazing sims with the right mod.
  • You guys should try Assetto Corsa. That game is absolutely awesome. The best racing/ driving game I ever played.

    Got over 600 hours with the game on Steam already and still not getting bored :)

    saw dude with a custom racing simulator playing that.

    looked ridiculous (in a good way).
  • mikeq67 wrote: »
    And 5 consecutive years of the game getting worse post beta/demo have told us all we need to know about this game. The problems arent going to get fixed.
    Couldn't be more true. It's nice to see people are finally making a stand. I've put so much effort into trying to help, only to be completely ignored. This game has been such a disappointment over the past 3 years, I'm not supporting this franchise anymore.
  • Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    I wanted to play the beta, I even signed up for it but the code didn't work on my PC... :neutral:
  • Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    I wanted to play the beta, I even signed up for it but the code didn't work on my PC... :neutral:

    it was in your email, and the second week the beta was free open
  • mikeq67 wrote: »
    And 5 consecutive years of the game getting worse post beta/demo have told us all we need to know about this game. The problems arent going to get fixed.
    Couldn't be more true. It's nice to see people are finally making a stand. I've put so much effort into trying to help, only to be completely ignored. This game has been such a disappointment over the past 3 years, I'm not supporting this franchise anymore.

    So 3 posts about connection to servers and 50 posts is alot of effort?
  • Everyone saying they aren't playing the beta anymore, that leaves less people to give feedback to EA, and what does that mean? It means less stuff gets changed. If you don't want the same game every year, then how about just play the freaking beta and report what changes you wanna see, WITHOUT insulting them and being douchebags

    I wanted to play the beta, I even signed up for it but the code didn't work on my PC... :neutral:

    it was in your email, and the second week the beta was free open

    Key phrase: pc

    B)
  • mikeq67 wrote: »
    And 5 consecutive years of the game getting worse post beta/demo have told us all we need to know about this game. The problems arent going to get fixed.
    Couldn't be more true. It's nice to see people are finally making a stand. I've put so much effort into trying to help, only to be completely ignored. This game has been such a disappointment over the past 3 years, I'm not supporting this franchise anymore.

    So 3 posts about connection to servers and 50 posts is alot of effort?

    lol. Ya I'd say so. 50 posts solely about the connection issues is quite a lot. And for all of them to be ignored is pretty funny, especially since it's now the biggest complaint on these forums. It's their own ignorance to blame if their sales figures suck this year.
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