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If current nhl 19

If current nhl19 is anything like nhl20 will be the developers need to go back to the drawing board or market as figure skating 20 with sticks.

Replies

  • Their way of making the game challenging is by: penalties being constantly called against the player teams, creating the worst gameplay, making the game very unbalanced where opposing AI benefits from every good or bad play the player makes or doesn't and don't even get me started on our own AI's that are so stupid compared to the opposing AI.
  • Darkop28 it’s all because they have a better ping rate since theirs is higher you AI rides the short bus. It has become no fun and they say they are making goalies better I have posted photos of a silver Goalie making 30+ saves against my 97 overall team. They need to take out the glitches and it will be better but instead they are adding more.
  • Shot totals doesn't always mean something. Some people are happy just to get the puck on net the second a defender comes anywhere near them. When you know how and when to shoot, you only need 6 shots to get 3 or 4 goals.
  • I think some people need to realize, that at the end of the day, this is a video game. People who are good at video games can and will learn the intricacies of the game, and that means high shooting % on low shots sometimes.

    Once you accept that this is a video game first, and hockey second, it might be a bit easier to swallow that you're being beat by lower shot totals, or TOA, etc.

    Don't use real world hockey examples to explain why you shouldn't be losing in a video game. There is virtually no correlation.
  • I think some people need to realize, that at the end of the day, this is a video game. People who are good at video games can and will learn the intricacies of the game, and that means high shooting % on low shots sometimes.

    Once you accept that this is a video game first, and hockey second, it might be a bit easier to swallow that you're being beat by lower shot totals, or TOA, etc.

    Don't use real world hockey examples to explain why you shouldn't be losing in a video game. There is virtually no correlation.

    Right.

    At the end of the day, it isn't a sport trying to be a video game. It is a video game trying to emulate certain aspects of the sport.
  • So by knowing how and when to shoot creates the video game glitch aspect of the game. A quality shot in this game is not rewarded as much as a glitch spot goal. I can handle getting beat by a player who jukes the goalie on a break or on a one handed shot this is a player better on the controller than I am. Its funny because we want to act like those spots don’t exist. The skate down the wall reverse direction and short side the goalie works 90% of the time, if the other player doesn’t defend it. What’s interesting is a new player going through tutorials don’t get the here’s the hot spot to score from or the here’s how to make a perfect pass while getting laid out by the d vs having it bounce off the defenders skate. But since not much has changed with this game those who have been playing since 15 know the spots. There isn’t many help type videos out there. I understand my skill isn’t the top but I have won D1 and win my fair share of games, what’s frustrating is scoring 5+ goals one game with the same quality of shots then the next vs a lower rated goalie shots hi the wall or the goalie becomes one.

    I can say there is a lot of enjoyment in beating a team that looks for the known places to shoot, manipulates the circle of invincibility and manipulates the poke and checks. It’s just as equally frustrating to lose a game because of someone that plays that way. I don’t poke or lift very often because I’m not good at it and I don’t like to stay in the box. I would like to learn how to do them. Just like I would love to learn how to hit someone from behind and bring the puck through them back to my stick or bounce perfectly to a teammate on a breakaway.
  • So by knowing how and when to shoot creates the video game glitch aspect of the game. A quality shot in this game is not rewarded as much as a glitch spot goal. I can handle getting beat by a player who jukes the goalie on a break or on a one handed shot this is a player better on the controller than I am. Its funny because we want to act like those spots don’t exist. The skate down the wall reverse direction and short side the goalie works 90% of the time, if the other player doesn’t defend it. What’s interesting is a new player going through tutorials don’t get the here’s the hot spot to score from or the here’s how to make a perfect pass while getting laid out by the d vs having it bounce off the defenders skate. But since not much has changed with this game those who have been playing since 15 know the spots. There isn’t many help type videos out there. I understand my skill isn’t the top but I have won D1 and win my fair share of games, what’s frustrating is scoring 5+ goals one game with the same quality of shots then the next vs a lower rated goalie shots hi the wall or the goalie becomes one.

    I can say there is a lot of enjoyment in beating a team that looks for the known places to shoot, manipulates the circle of invincibility and manipulates the poke and checks. It’s just as equally frustrating to lose a game because of someone that plays that way. I don’t poke or lift very often because I’m not good at it and I don’t like to stay in the box. I would like to learn how to do them. Just like I would love to learn how to hit someone from behind and bring the puck through them back to my stick or bounce perfectly to a teammate on a breakaway.

    You're under the assumption that perfectly executed goals are somehow glitches.

    I think you need to brush up on your definitions.

    A glitch is an unintended outcome from the underlying code, when a specific situation hasn't been programmed. Basically the game doesn't know what to do and "glitches".

    You're simply losing to people with a better understanding of the game mechanics. Sure, connection also plays a role, but ultimately, it sounds like you just can't separate the fact that this is a game, from the real world hockey. So you're using real world rules to justify why certain things should or shouldn't happen in game. That is fundamentally the wrong way to look at it.

    Hockey knowledge, combined with a deep understanding of the game mechanics, and a matching skillset to apply controller input accurately, will win you games. Having a great connection will only amplify that.

    Having an awful connection(to the server, not connection in general) can negate that.

    Only playing real hockey in the real world, will yield what you want.
  • WainGretSki
    3660 posts Member
    edited July 2019
    So by knowing how and when to shoot creates the video game glitch aspect of the game. A quality shot in this game is not rewarded as much as a glitch spot goal. I can handle getting beat by a player who jukes the goalie on a break or on a one handed shot this is a player better on the controller than I am. Its funny because we want to act like those spots don’t exist. The skate down the wall reverse direction and short side the goalie works 90% of the time, if the other player doesn’t defend it. What’s interesting is a new player going through tutorials don’t get the here’s the hot spot to score from or the here’s how to make a perfect pass while getting laid out by the d vs having it bounce off the defenders skate. But since not much has changed with this game those who have been playing since 15 know the spots. There isn’t many help type videos out there. I understand my skill isn’t the top but I have won D1 and win my fair share of games, what’s frustrating is scoring 5+ goals one game with the same quality of shots then the next vs a lower rated goalie shots hi the wall or the goalie becomes one.

    I can say there is a lot of enjoyment in beating a team that looks for the known places to shoot, manipulates the circle of invincibility and manipulates the poke and checks. It’s just as equally frustrating to lose a game because of someone that plays that way. I don’t poke or lift very often because I’m not good at it and I don’t like to stay in the box. I would like to learn how to do them. Just like I would love to learn how to hit someone from behind and bring the puck through them back to my stick or bounce perfectly to a teammate on a breakaway.

    Well, I hate glitch shots too, or those supposedly "high scoring areas". The thing is though, it makes for a predictable game, which is boring and stale, but it also makes it easier to defend. You know where players are going with the puck. You know they will curl near the faceoff dots and cut to the high slot. Sadly, defense in this game is more knowing where a player will be vs actually doing something while he is where he is.

    Also, practice containment alot more than attacking the puck. You know where he wants to go for that sweet spot shot? Then focus on keeping him away from there, or time a body check just before he gets there to shoot. You can also use those spots as bait. If he thinks he has a shot at getting there, then set him up to go there and cream him. Those sweet spots are a two-way street in your zone.

    The defensive skill stick is an important tool. It helps to guide players into certain areas, it makes for much more precise, quick and controllable poke checks (press R3 to poke while in the DSS), and it helps to gauge player gap. I see alot of defenders backing up too much from their blue line and leaving much too big of a gap on the carrier. You should ideally be about 1.5 to 2 stick lengths away from him. By having your DSS out, it better helps gauge how much of a gap you need to leave, or close. It also helps to knock away a lose puck should an attacker just try to stick handle around it or help to close off passing lanes. You might have noticed not many players use saucer passes, so the odds are good having a stick in the passing lane will disrupt it.

    If you love throwing checks, try to time them as much as possible on a forward that is about to receive a pass. That is when they are extremely vulnerable and also that is where gap control will help alot. If you are too far away or want to ramp up alot of speed to hit, that is when you will miss. You are giving the carrier time to deke around you, or flat out avoid you. Tight gap = less reaction time. Too far a gap and you limit your options or you are giving him more time and space for more options against you.

    For those that love to deke, learn the timing of the deke and wait for it to play out. He will be very vulnerable just as his deke is about to finish. Timing is crucial on defense. Being too aggressive on a deker puts you in the box or sets you up to fail your body checks.

    For those that love to twirl around in the corner, let them. They aren't a high threat at this point in time. Just keep him there, don't chase yourself out of position and with time, he may turn over the puck by trying to force a play. Get close enough to keep him there while doing your best to close off passing lanes and this also helps to close the gap should he try a wraparound. Too far away, you leave the area behind the net open to him, and you allow him time and space to wiggle away or cut to the high lot. Incidental contact is also a good friend to know on the ice so you don't always need to try to hit.

    For those that really are top players, not much I can add to help you. They are top players for a reason. They have alot more than a single trick and they absolutely know how to abuse every weakness in the game. They can and will hurt you in many ways. Practice is the best tool against these guys and try to be patient and keep a cool head. Learn what they are doing and why it works.

    In the end, practice your gap, your timing, and contain players to areas you are comfortable having them in. People seem to forget it's ok to have an opposing player in your zone with possession. What matters are the options you leave him while he has the puck.

    I don't know which game mode you play the most, but if it's EASHL, I suggest you stick to only 1 build until you are perfectly comfortable with it and know it's strengths and weaknesses. Know how to exploit it, and make up for its shortcomings before moving on to another build. If you keep switching builds from game to game it will take alot longer to get comfortable with the builds. You will need to adapt your gameplay depending on the build you choose.

    I don't consider myself as an all star absolute best d man, but I can say I am pretty good when I want to and depending on the context of the game. Having a good D partner greatly helps me being a better player as I can focus on my game and trust my partner to do his part. I am exclusively an EASHL player.

    Also, another good thing to do on D is knowing when you simply got beat. It happens. Sometimes you simply need to accept you got beat by a clean play, or a better player and shrug it off. Learn from that mistake if you can.
    Reviewing replays after the game can immensely help you learn, and quickly. Especially against really really good opponents.

    Hope any of this helps and if it's nothing new to you, don't feel offended as it isn't my intention.

    Here's to hoping 20 is worth buying :wink:
    Post edited by WainGretSki on
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