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NHL 20 Content Update December 5th

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  • EA_Aljo wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    Speaking from a dedicated teal perspective in multi-player game modes...

    Limiting poke checking to where you have to time them just right to be useful is not a problem for me (I've got the timing down very well). What IS a problem for me is when I, as a defensemen, am properly positioned (back-skating and facing) against a puck carrier entering the zone, I slow down to close the gap on him, and I hit poke check, the animation has me swinging the stick at his feet, as opposed to his stick blade (which is right in front of me). What defensemen in the NHL, in this situation, swats at the puck carrier's feet and not the puck carrier's stick blade? That's just pure fantasy. I won't even get into LT spin use by the puck carrier in that situation as a means to draw a tripping penalty, as naturally, that's a flaw in the code (the defensemen is properly positioned, and shouldn't be penalized in that situation). It's a bail out for the puck carrier.

    If a puck carrier turns the corner on me, and I poke check him from behind, I fully deserve a penalty in that situation. The same goes for lazy play. If I'm off my game, and find myself behind the play more than I should be, I SHOULD be put into the box every single time I poke check from behind. No argument here.

    Finally, sticks on the ice...

    If I'm properly positioned on D, and I hold my stick out on the ice (to keep the puck carrier on the short side of my goalie), and the puck carrier skates into my stick (pulling my goalie off of his post), that's an automatic penalty for me. How can that be a penalty for me, when I have just as much right to that open space (which I got to first) as the puck carrier does? That too is a bail out for puck-hogging, LT abusers.

    Or, say if I'm beaten by a puck carrier (happens from time to time), where now he is on a breakaway on my goalie, and I'm right behind him. My job at that point, is to try to keep him on one side of the goalie. So, say he is on the right side of the slot, and I hold my stick straight out towards him but on his left side (to prevent him from crossing over the goalie), and then he skates into my out-stretched stick. Should I get a tripping penalty for that, since I claimed that open ice space before the puck carrier did? This is how your code logic currently works, which again favors the puck carrier.

    Currently, positional defensive play is an extremely under-rewarding experience. Yesterday's patch helped a LOT in multiplayer modes, but it's still not quite where it needs to be from a defensive aspect, especially against the Boitano-like LT'ers.

    1) It would be good to see when you're swinging at his feet instead of the stick. When you poke, it's aimed at the puck, but if there's not much of a gap, your chances of hitting their feet go up a lot. I'd really have to see video on this. I'm a mostly dedicated D man myself and I've had the same thing happen, but it's always when I slow up to much to shorten the gap when it happens. Also, it's possible when you slow down, you're also hitting up on the stick, which would cause you to make more of a lunging poke. Those have a much higher risk of causing a trip than if you were still backskating. Just something to watch out for.

    2) As far as LT'ing goes, that's not a flaw in the code. The ability to do this has lessened a lot, but a player going into a backskate is still possible of course. It's something defenders need to be mindful of. I've received many a tripping call in that same situation. It's a lack of patience on my own part. Especially when I've seen them attempt it previously in that game.

    3) You need to be in control of your stick. The idea is not to just continually hold in DSS and get away with knocking the puck loose. You still have to be mindful of where it is. It would cause a trip if it goes from inside the leg to the outside. When your stick is getting too close, pull it back. It's up to you to control your stick better. I'm not saying we can't improve here so please don't take it that way. I use DSS a lot and am always conscious of the carrier's legs so that I minimize my chances of having them skate into my stick.

    4) I just can't agree with you that positional defensive play is unrewarding. Again, I agree it could be improved, but proper positioning is going to greatly reduce the carrier's options. You can force them to the outside and cut off their passing/shooting lanes. I get it might not be as exciting as throwing a big hit, but you're still doing your part as a defender.

    1) I'm guessing that's because it's the same poke check animation regardless of the gap distance? That makes sense of course, but where a 2nd poke check animation (invoked from a closer distance) would solve that problem. Defensemen in the NHL can dynamically change the way they poke check based on distance, which should be reproduced in the game.

    2) Being "possible" is one thing. Being abused, is another thing. I can't recall the last NHL game I've seen where on every rush, the puck carrier is skating ****-backwards into the zone, and towards the net. It's definitely a dilemna for you, as I'm sure you don't support exploit abuse. Unfortunately, I see it performed all the time by the "elite" players of the product.

    3) In fact, when I DSS, I'm also changing the direction of my stick while holding it on the ice, so I'm definitely conscious of this. But when I hold it straight out in one direction (as a means to claim space), I should not be called for a tripping penalty if an opposing puck carrier decides to skate into my stationary stick. If I MOVE the stick into his legs, then yes, a penalty call is deserved, and that has definitely happened to me (deservedly so).

    4) If one plays proper positional defense (which is my game - or which I at least try to make my game), you don't even HAVE to hit. That's why the definition of a check is "separating a player from the puck". Hitting is not required for this, as Nicklas Lidström proved in his illustrious career. As for hitting, it shouldn't be how many times you hit, but WHEN you hit. Starting your body check from the defensive zone faceoff dot, and executing it at the blue line, over and over again (with no charging calls), is NOT the way defense is played in the NHL. But I bet it's very exciting for a large portion of your customers. :)

    It would be great if we could control how far you poke. That's probably a tricky one to do as we're limited by the options on a standard controller.

    I understand that it's unrealistic to backskate into the zone repeatedly. If you notice they are doing this, step up for a hit or just use your body to hinder their movement. They can be stopped.

    Thanks for the feedback on DSS. I'll pass it on.

    A charging call should be happening when you're holding the hit for too long. I believe 3 strides or more. I see those get called pretty regularly so if you have any issues with them not being called, get us some video for review and I'll send it over to the dev team.

    @EA_Aljo - I sent you a PM as to not flood the forum with technical details. Thanks.
  • EA_Aljo
    3217 posts EA Community Manager
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.
  • EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.
  • EA_Aljo
    3217 posts EA Community Manager
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.

    That wasn't the case in this situation. He was just moving too slow and didn't have enough force behind the hit to knock him down.
  • EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.

    That wasn't the case in this situation. He was just moving too slow and didn't have enough force behind the hit to knock him down.

    Doesn't explain how the CPU can just knock you down, moving too slow as well, with no problem. Or how they can check you from behind and knock you down. Just feels like there are so many inconsistencies between the CPU and HUM with aspects of this game even though the sliders are equal, and ratings are similar.
  • Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.

    That wasn't the case in this situation. He was just moving too slow and didn't have enough force behind the hit to knock him down.

    Doesn't explain how the CPU can just knock you down, moving too slow as well, with no problem. Or how they can check you from behind and knock you down. Just feels like there are so many inconsistencies between the CPU and HUM with aspects of this game even though the sliders are equal, and ratings are similar.

    To me this comes in 2nd place to the AI's ability to just coast up behind you and suck the puck right from your stick. So annoying!
  • EA_Aljo
    3217 posts EA Community Manager
    Steven5470 wrote: »

    Doesn't explain how the CPU can just knock you down, moving too slow as well, with no problem. Or how they can check you from behind and knock you down. Just feels like there are so many inconsistencies between the CPU and HUM with aspects of this game even though the sliders are equal, and ratings are similar.

    I'd need to see some video since there are a lot of variables to consider. I haven't seen AI players knocking you down from behind, but it is pretty frustrating when they keep knocking you off the puck from behind. Then, you pick it up and they hit you again, repeat. I see that happen a lot in HUT.
  • Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.

    That wasn't the case in this situation. He was just moving too slow and didn't have enough force behind the hit to knock him down.

    Doesn't explain how the CPU can just knock you down, moving too slow as well, with no problem. Or how they can check you from behind and knock you down. Just feels like there are so many inconsistencies between the CPU and HUM with aspects of this game even though the sliders are equal, and ratings are similar.

    There is no spoon.
  • EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    Steven5470 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »

    You replied to it in another thread.

    Thanks. Found it. I respond to a lot of posts here and was having trouble tracking it down.

    @Steven5470

    Chances are good that hit would have knocked the puck loose, but the pass was made before we could find out. A head-on collision like that should dislodge it, but not the impact wasn't enough to knock him down.

    The funny thing, my guy was skating full speed. When he hit, it was as if nothing even registered. The other player didn't even move. Yet, when the CPU does this to your player, your guy goes flying to the ice. Heck, the CPU can knock you down within a foot! It's frustrating and very unrealistic. This is another thing users have reported. The hitting is weird like that. Not only a bubble sometimes, but feels like you can hit the opposing player when it's "convenient" and not when it should happen.

    Are you talking about the Duncan Keith video you posted? If so, he had just started skating after being flat-footed. He wasn't at full speed.

    He was at enough speed it should have caused some type of hit. As others have mentioned, the CPU can be a shorter distance, "flat-footed", and knock you to the ice with no problem. They can stand next to you and knock you down. My guy skates and barely nudges the other player.

    That wasn't the case in this situation. He was just moving too slow and didn't have enough force behind the hit to knock him down.

    No bht i get what hes saying. The ai chases you and harasses you from behind with shoves and bumps that do as little as make you stumble and slow down so they get the puck, to these TINY shoves sending you straight to the ice. And, while we're talking about all the hits to the back...what ever happened to cross checking? That's literally what the a.i. does to you the whole time its. Near you. Also, why can their players run my guys without the puck over and its fine, but i get incidental contact with someone who im not even facing, and its interference? Your penalty system needs a major overhaul please.
  • EA_Aljo
    3217 posts EA Community Manager

    No bht i get what hes saying. The ai chases you and harasses you from behind with shoves and bumps that do as little as make you stumble and slow down so they get the puck, to these TINY shoves sending you straight to the ice. And, while we're talking about all the hits to the back...what ever happened to cross checking? That's literally what the a.i. does to you the whole time its. Near you. Also, why can their players run my guys without the puck over and its fine, but i get incidental contact with someone who im not even facing, and its interference? Your penalty system needs a major overhaul please.

    I agree the AI hitting you from behind is frustrating. I deal with that as well. I just try to get rid of the puck as quick as I can. In most cases it works. I haven't noticed them sending me straight to the ice though. That happens with a hit and not a shove. If you're seeing it with shoves, try to get some video.

    Players have a certain amount of freedom around battling for the puck. They can push and shove. Obviously a hit from behind should be a penalty, but these aren't hits. In most cases the carrier retains control of the puck until they either move it or get some separation. I deal with this myself in most every Squad Battles game I play. It's annoying, but we also had a lot of complaints that bumps didn't do enough. That was part of the reverted beta tuner from last year. The community wanted low-speed hits to make more of an impact.
  • Is there anyway to make this game like nhl 11, 12 or 13 cause he rest of the series is random no skill no control crap. Creetings from Europe.
  • EA_Aljo wrote: »

    No bht i get what hes saying. The ai chases you and harasses you from behind with shoves and bumps that do as little as make you stumble and slow down so they get the puck, to these TINY shoves sending you straight to the ice. And, while we're talking about all the hits to the back...what ever happened to cross checking? That's literally what the a.i. does to you the whole time its. Near you. Also, why can their players run my guys without the puck over and its fine, but i get incidental contact with someone who im not even facing, and its interference? Your penalty system needs a major overhaul please.

    I agree the AI hitting you from behind is frustrating. I deal with that as well. I just try to get rid of the puck as quick as I can. In most cases it works. I haven't noticed them sending me straight to the ice though. That happens with a hit and not a shove. If you're seeing it with shoves, try to get some video.

    Players have a certain amount of freedom around battling for the puck. They can push and shove. Obviously a hit from behind should be a penalty, but these aren't hits. In most cases the carrier retains control of the puck until they either move it or get some separation. I deal with this myself in most every Squad Battles game I play. It's annoying, but we also had a lot of complaints that bumps didn't do enough. That was part of the reverted beta tuner from last year. The community wanted low-speed hits to make more of an impact.

    I agree the bumps from behind should be there to force you to pass or shoot, but when they do it 4 times in a row, until the animation completes, you cant do either. I say bring the cross checking penalty back in the game and depending on strength and frequency of these bumps, call it a cross check. Not a ton but it would be more realistic, as well as having a risk/reward thing goin on.
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