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D to D one-timers

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I only got back into this series last month so I’m doing a lot of research. Apologies if this has already been answered - I was unable to search for this answer on the boards

What constitutes the ability to successfully get off a D to D one-timer
I’m sure there are many factors all working together at the same time, but is there any specific trait that will lead to success wrt any of the following?

Overall rating of player
D-man on off-hand side
D-man not being covered during pass
D-man in position (wheelhouse) for pass
Level: SB vs Online play
Level: Pro vs Allstar, etc...
D-Man receiving a hard vs normal pass

Or does all of this simply come down to certain individual attribute and random generation for one-timers?

Thanks

Replies

  • The Hand Eye attribute is important for any one timer, as well. Success, as in scoring, will be helped by good shot aim, the passer selling 'shot' before the pass (pass from forehand is better than backhand, for example), making the tendy move, net traffic etc.
  • y0uthX
    54 posts Member
    Good point on the selling the shot before the pass. Do you mean just having the puck on the forehand to ‘sell’ the shot or do you mean by actually faking a shot before the pass?

    And where do you aim typically? I’ve read a lot of posts that it’s preferable to aim low vs top corner
  • On 1T, it is better to aim low. If you aim high, it will most likely miss the net. If you want to shoot high from far away from the net, it is better to stop the puck, then shoot.

    You don’t need to fake a shot, just be in a position where you could shoot well. It forces the goalie to consider the shooting threat and it will most likely make it be late on his slide if you end up passing. If you are not positioned in a way to take a shot, he will just go for the pass and might stop it depending on the situation.
  • y0uthX
    54 posts Member
    Thanks for the insight
    So here’s a question that applies to one-timers when you’re on the wing. You say that to setup a successful one-timer you should be in a position as threat to shoot. But from all the youtuber/twitch feeds I watch I constantly see a winger (off-hand of course) circling in the corner waiting for the perfect cross crease one-tuner attempt.
    So what typically happens is because the winger with the puck is on their off wing, I always see them protecting the puck on their backhand just before they pass the puck cross crease. So why does this work? Because shouldn’t it NOT work? When they make the pass, they’re on their backhand, and if their on their backhand, shouldn’t the goalie perceive this as the player with the puck NOT being a ‘threat’ to shoot the puck and therefore get across their crease faster when the puck is passed?
  • y0uthX wrote: »
    Thanks for the insight
    So here’s a question that applies to one-timers when you’re on the wing. You say that to setup a successful one-timer you should be in a position as threat to shoot. But from all the youtuber/twitch feeds I watch I constantly see a winger (off-hand of course) circling in the corner waiting for the perfect cross crease one-tuner attempt.
    So what typically happens is because the winger with the puck is on their off wing, I always see them protecting the puck on their backhand just before they pass the puck cross crease. So why does this work? Because shouldn’t it NOT work? When they make the pass, they’re on their backhand, and if their on their backhand, shouldn’t the goalie perceive this as the player with the puck NOT being a ‘threat’ to shoot the puck and therefore get across their crease faster when the puck is passed?

    You’re right and most people do that. The trick and important thing about it though is to wait as much as you can before going backhand. It is a matter of balance on when you do it and many other factors. It doesn’t mean that it will not work if you’re backhand protecting the puck, just that the goalie will be less worrying about the shot and will be focusing more on the pass. Depending on the goalie attributes, he may or may not do the save. At this stage of the year though, chances are that they have a better goalie and he might do the save.

    If you want, you can watch that video (mostly the end). He reads what a developer said to a player with the video in the background. It might make more sense.

  • Boum pretty much answered your questions, but I'll chime in again regarding fake shots. As Boum said, executing a fake shot isn't neccessary to fool the tendy prior to a one timer. The instances where I use a fake (either a leg kick fake wrister, or fake clapper) are; prior to a slap pass as it's kind of part of the process, while walking the line as a D, or simply while moving (east/west or north, either way) just to freeze the tendy a bit before an actual shot or pass. I have thrown a fake in now and then prior to making a one timer pass, but I haven't noticed any significant change to success rate.

    Fake shots are still fairly effective and I feel like they're under utilized the way most people play.
  • EA_Blueberry
    4836 posts EA Community Manager
    Davanial wrote: »

    Fake shots are still fairly effective and I feel like they're under utilized the way most people play.

    They also make the goal a lot cooler. B)
  • y0uthX wrote: »
    Thanks for the insight
    So here’s a question that applies to one-timers when you’re on the wing. You say that to setup a successful one-timer you should be in a position as threat to shoot. But from all the youtuber/twitch feeds I watch I constantly see a winger (off-hand of course) circling in the corner waiting for the perfect cross crease one-tuner attempt.
    So what typically happens is because the winger with the puck is on their off wing, I always see them protecting the puck on their backhand just before they pass the puck cross crease. So why does this work? Because shouldn’t it NOT work? When they make the pass, they’re on their backhand, and if their on their backhand, shouldn’t the goalie perceive this as the player with the puck NOT being a ‘threat’ to shoot the puck and therefore get across their crease faster when the puck is passed?

    You're right in that it should not work. It's an exploit that people use and it wrecks the online experience.
  • boumbidiboum
    446 posts Member
    edited April 2020
    Being on backhand doesn’t mean that you’re not a threat, it just reduce the level of threat since the shot will not be as powerful and precise as a forehand shot. While they are in the corner, they are not a threat whatsoever. The only things that you need to do is to block the passing lane and keep them there. When they score they usually not pass from the corner, they are heading toward the front of the net, which makes them a threat so the goalie needs to stay longer on the short side in case they shoot. This is why that technique works well. It is not fun to do or play against, and not very realistic, but it works for those reasons.
  • y0uthX
    54 posts Member
    Quick question
    After you’ve made your pass from one D to the other D, does it matter if you just push up on on the stick or should you pull back on the stick first before pushing up?
    Will that increase the shot power?
  • YZ19
    171 posts Member
    y0uthX wrote: »
    Quick question
    After you’ve made your pass from one D to the other D, does it matter if you just push up on on the stick or should you pull back on the stick first before pushing up?
    Will that increase the shot power?

    In my experience yes more power but harder to time properly... you'll end up fanning on the shot if not done quick enough
  • y0uthX
    54 posts Member
    So should you perform the pull-back and then forward action as soon as you’ve made the pass or just before the puck reaches the D man?
  • YZ19
    171 posts Member
    y0uthX wrote: »
    So should you perform the pull-back and then forward action as soon as you’ve made the pass or just before the puck reaches the D man?

    Most of the time I just press forward
    It happens so fast you have to be lighting fast and it also depends how far away the other d man is
  • YZ19
    171 posts Member
    They also changed the passing
    You used to be able to hold the button longer for a harder pass now it's just one speed no matter what
  • y0uthX
    54 posts Member
    They changed the passing? Since when? I’m using the trigger for passing (if that’s what you mean by ‘button’)
  • YZ19
    171 posts Member
    Cant remember when they changed it 17 18 or 19
    But u used to be able to hold the button down longer for a harder pass, hold down to long and the guy couldn't receive it. Now it's just the same speed no matter what
  • EA_Blueberry
    4836 posts EA Community Manager
    @y0uthX @YZ19

    In NHL 20, the longer you hold down the right trigger the harder the pass.
  • I think that the pass speed is increased or lowered by the pass assistance, so this is why it doesn’t seem to matter much, but pretty sure if you disable it completely, you would see a difference.
  • EA_Aljo
    3229 posts EA Community Manager
    I think that the pass speed is increased or lowered by the pass assistance, so this is why it doesn’t seem to matter much, but pretty sure if you disable it completely, you would see a difference.

    Online Pass Assistance doesn't modify the speed. Only your aim is affected.
  • Passes are a lot slower in general this year, but holding down the trigger does still result in harder passes, they just aren't nearly as fast as past years.
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