EA Forums - Banner

What another awesome drop in game...

2Next

Replies

  • belair_col
    105 posts Member
    edited July 4
    I mean if you're going to post a video trying to fluff the game, I would've thought it would've been a video of you winning hockey games.

    What were you honestly trying to prove by posting that? Especially when you considered that 'boosting'. You played passive defense. You'd get ruined against competitive players.

    Their AI have been a mess for years. It's the reason why sliders are absolutely necessary for offline gameplay. Considering '21 was a half-cooked travesty, I don't think you'll see many of their developers defending it. They dropped the price on it almost immediately after release.
  • EA_Aljo
    3193 posts EA Community Manager
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    No they aren't. Their animations after contact are significantly shorter. The 'bumps' that are extremely effective against human players are useless against AI. Their reaction time is reduced and their ability to anticipate the play is based on reading the human player's inputs. Their impact on the game is also heavily impacted by the games built-in 'momentum'. They're very fortunate when it comes to loose or bouncing pucks and they complete passes at an almost 100% rate.

    Drop-in teams generally have poor chemistry so they do a poor job of anticipating their teammates. So the logic of trying to play through several of the game's turbo CPU sprites is generally how teams regularly turn their wins into losses.

    Another thing ragging the puck exposes is how poorly the game's defensive strategies are executed by the AI. And this is coming from a defenseman who doesn't do it often, nor do they abuse the LT exploit.

    There is no built in momentum.

    Yes, they also have fast reaction times, but that also depends on their overall. Humans can complete passes at 100% rate as well. That's dependent on your aim and finding open lanes. They also know how to position themselves to pick up loose pucks. Many humans just skate to the puck as quick as possible without noticing how it's bouncing and position themselves to have a better chance to pick it up.

    I agree with the ragging from the AI. It's very annoying, but they are doing it to open up passing lanes. It's something that happens in the real world as well. You see defenders retreat with the puck to set up a breakout. The more you chase them, the more you cut off their options so they continue to retreat. I usually back off and let them begin to breakout and then pressure the carrier. Regardless, they are still playing according to the same game mechanics as everyone else.

    I know you can also pass at 100%. We're talking about World of Chel drop-ins though. These are games where most of the time there are at least two or three players who don't even know where they need to be defensively. It took me years to refine my passing in these games. And this game mode is full of people who just downloaded the game off of Game Pass. Expecting them to know the nuances of the game's passing system and have them skating the correct routes is a massive stretch. More often then not they'll try to skate in a straight line through defenders, often resulting in frequent turnovers.

    A team that gets out to a quick 2 or 3 goal lead shouldn't have to deal with the game's turbo AI consistently being the ones changing the game's momentum. And it's exceptionally easy to see the different bounces and deflections that occur when the AI is involved in the play. The game physics changes. Pucks frequently bounce straight back to them or a teammate off of pokes, hits, deflections or rebounds. They're impervious to contact.

    AI is horrendously broken in the game.

    Drop-ins are a great place to get used to online team play. We all have to start somewhere. You can be a pro at head-to-head or single-player modes, but when you get a group of humans together, the game plays very differently. It takes time to learn how to play effectively with other humans. There's also the On-Ice Trainer to help out newer players.

    There is no momentum that boosts one team over the other. The physics are not changing for AI players as well. They are bound to the same physics as everyone else. Discussing momentum of this nature is against the rules. Please keep this in mind as you run the risk of receiving a suspension or ban for breaking the rules.
  • jrago73
    746 posts Member
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    I strongly disagree, at least for EASHL.

    On a race for an iced puck etc you can have a head start, be hustling and running straight up but that perfectly balanced "2 way d" will beat Joe NHL's minimum sized sniper from behind and get that puck every time.

    Now that faster than any human ai gets the puck and it takes significantly more contact to knock them down or even jar the puck loose even when you line up a good hit with a bigger and stronger player.

    But when your massive and strong human player has the puck the ai can knock it off of you like you're a minimum sized sniper or it can just check you 10 times in a row without letting you move.

    I'll hear arguments about making better decisions and movements, I won't even argue about how much better they are at winning those 50/50 puck battles every time, but there is no world in which I can believe that they are playing by the same physics and/or class builds that the humans do.

    Disclaimer- yes they can be beat and most humans are dumb yadda yadda yadda so let's limit any argument to this post to the situations mentioned above and avoid focusing on irrelevant factors please.
  • EA_Aljo
    3193 posts EA Community Manager
    @jrago73

    Can you get some video of some instances where this is happening? I'll get it over to the dev team for review.
  • IceLion68
    1610 posts Member
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    @jrago73

    Can you get some video of some instances where this is happening? I'll get it over to the dev team for review.

    FWIW while I dont have video, I can 100% validate that while playing LD, if the opposite team ices the puck on MY side, my AI RD partner will ALWAYS beat me to the puck - don't even get me started as to WHY he would do this... let alone THAT he can do this.
    Dad. Gamer. Rocker. Geek.
  • j0rtsu67
    644 posts Member
    edited July 8
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    @jrago73

    Can you get some video of some instances where this is happening? I'll get it over to the dev team for review.

    FWIW while I dont have video, I can 100% validate that while playing LD, if the opposite team ices the puck on MY side, my AI RD partner will ALWAYS beat me to the puck - don't even get me started as to WHY he would do this... let alone THAT he can do this.
    I agree 100% with an exception that I play RD.
    But what makes it more weird, very often if I'm not going to that puck, nor is he... it's like he's only interested if I am and just wants to annoy me. :D
  • jrago73
    746 posts Member
    j0rtsu67 wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    @jrago73

    Can you get some video of some instances where this is happening? I'll get it over to the dev team for review.

    FWIW while I dont have video, I can 100% validate that while playing LD, if the opposite team ices the puck on MY side, my AI RD partner will ALWAYS beat me to the puck - don't even get me started as to WHY he would do this... let alone THAT he can do this.
    I agree 100% with an exception that I play RD.
    But what makes it more weird, very often if I'm not going to that puck, nor is he... it's like he's only interested if I am and just wants to annoy me. :D

    I was going to mention that too lol. If I see him hitting the nitro and he's clearly going to beat me to the puck I go cover his side and try to make myself a pass option and then the **** just leaves the puck there for the other team to grab.
  • jrago73 wrote: »
    j0rtsu67 wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    @jrago73

    Can you get some video of some instances where this is happening? I'll get it over to the dev team for review.

    FWIW while I dont have video, I can 100% validate that while playing LD, if the opposite team ices the puck on MY side, my AI RD partner will ALWAYS beat me to the puck - don't even get me started as to WHY he would do this... let alone THAT he can do this.
    I agree 100% with an exception that I play RD.
    But what makes it more weird, very often if I'm not going to that puck, nor is he... it's like he's only interested if I am and just wants to annoy me. :D

    I was going to mention that too lol. If I see him hitting the nitro and he's clearly going to beat me to the puck I go cover his side and try to make myself a pass option and then the **** just leaves the puck there for the other team to grab.

    All true. I even use a Sniper (90-92 speed) when I play RD and the AI also beats me to the puck when retrieving it in my own end.

    That and the stupid LD AI won’t stay on his side especially when playing the point in the opposing zone. 😏😠
  • belair_col
    105 posts Member
    edited July 15
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    No they aren't. Their animations after contact are significantly shorter. The 'bumps' that are extremely effective against human players are useless against AI. Their reaction time is reduced and their ability to anticipate the play is based on reading the human player's inputs. Their impact on the game is also heavily impacted by the games built-in 'momentum'. They're very fortunate when it comes to loose or bouncing pucks and they complete passes at an almost 100% rate.

    Drop-in teams generally have poor chemistry so they do a poor job of anticipating their teammates. So the logic of trying to play through several of the game's turbo CPU sprites is generally how teams regularly turn their wins into losses.

    Another thing ragging the puck exposes is how poorly the game's defensive strategies are executed by the AI. And this is coming from a defenseman who doesn't do it often, nor do they abuse the LT exploit.

    There is no built in momentum.

    Yes, they also have fast reaction times, but that also depends on their overall. Humans can complete passes at 100% rate as well. That's dependent on your aim and finding open lanes. They also know how to position themselves to pick up loose pucks. Many humans just skate to the puck as quick as possible without noticing how it's bouncing and position themselves to have a better chance to pick it up.

    I agree with the ragging from the AI. It's very annoying, but they are doing it to open up passing lanes. It's something that happens in the real world as well. You see defenders retreat with the puck to set up a breakout. The more you chase them, the more you cut off their options so they continue to retreat. I usually back off and let them begin to breakout and then pressure the carrier. Regardless, they are still playing according to the same game mechanics as everyone else.

    I know you can also pass at 100%. We're talking about World of Chel drop-ins though. These are games where most of the time there are at least two or three players who don't even know where they need to be defensively. It took me years to refine my passing in these games. And this game mode is full of people who just downloaded the game off of Game Pass. Expecting them to know the nuances of the game's passing system and have them skating the correct routes is a massive stretch. More often then not they'll try to skate in a straight line through defenders, often resulting in frequent turnovers.

    A team that gets out to a quick 2 or 3 goal lead shouldn't have to deal with the game's turbo AI consistently being the ones changing the game's momentum. And it's exceptionally easy to see the different bounces and deflections that occur when the AI is involved in the play. The game physics changes. Pucks frequently bounce straight back to them or a teammate off of pokes, hits, deflections or rebounds. They're impervious to contact.

    AI is horrendously broken in the game.

    Drop-ins are a great place to get used to online team play. We all have to start somewhere. You can be a pro at head-to-head or single-player modes, but when you get a group of humans together, the game plays very differently. It takes time to learn how to play effectively with other humans. There's also the On-Ice Trainer to help out newer players.

    There is no momentum that boosts one team over the other. The physics are not changing for AI players as well. They are bound to the same physics as everyone else. Discussing momentum of this nature is against the rules. Please keep this in mind as you run the risk of receiving a suspension or ban for breaking the rules.
    You and I both know the AI are hilariously broken in this game. They cheat. Their animations, their speed, their endurance and their ability to separate while under pressure is completely different than that of a human character's. And when the leash is off and they're forced to adjust to two or three human players that knock them out of position and run them on an aggressive forecheck, they go turbo and can give even an average human player a massive competitive advantage.

    My favorite moment to describe this would have to be an AI controlled RD jumping over to the left side of the DZ ahead of his human teammate to dump a puck on a PK, only to beat everyone to that puck behind the opposing team's net. How is that in any way realistic? Turbo bot.

    Love the threat of the ban. I'm using this forum as an opportunity to display my disgust for the half-cooked project I paid full ticket price for. Instead of listening to the customer, you're doubling down to blindly defend it. And that's just convincing me that EA's next project won't be any better.
    Post edited by belair_col on
  • EA_Aljo
    3193 posts EA Community Manager
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    No they aren't. Their animations after contact are significantly shorter. The 'bumps' that are extremely effective against human players are useless against AI. Their reaction time is reduced and their ability to anticipate the play is based on reading the human player's inputs. Their impact on the game is also heavily impacted by the games built-in 'momentum'. They're very fortunate when it comes to loose or bouncing pucks and they complete passes at an almost 100% rate.

    Drop-in teams generally have poor chemistry so they do a poor job of anticipating their teammates. So the logic of trying to play through several of the game's turbo CPU sprites is generally how teams regularly turn their wins into losses.

    Another thing ragging the puck exposes is how poorly the game's defensive strategies are executed by the AI. And this is coming from a defenseman who doesn't do it often, nor do they abuse the LT exploit.

    There is no built in momentum.

    Yes, they also have fast reaction times, but that also depends on their overall. Humans can complete passes at 100% rate as well. That's dependent on your aim and finding open lanes. They also know how to position themselves to pick up loose pucks. Many humans just skate to the puck as quick as possible without noticing how it's bouncing and position themselves to have a better chance to pick it up.

    I agree with the ragging from the AI. It's very annoying, but they are doing it to open up passing lanes. It's something that happens in the real world as well. You see defenders retreat with the puck to set up a breakout. The more you chase them, the more you cut off their options so they continue to retreat. I usually back off and let them begin to breakout and then pressure the carrier. Regardless, they are still playing according to the same game mechanics as everyone else.

    I know you can also pass at 100%. We're talking about World of Chel drop-ins though. These are games where most of the time there are at least two or three players who don't even know where they need to be defensively. It took me years to refine my passing in these games. And this game mode is full of people who just downloaded the game off of Game Pass. Expecting them to know the nuances of the game's passing system and have them skating the correct routes is a massive stretch. More often then not they'll try to skate in a straight line through defenders, often resulting in frequent turnovers.

    A team that gets out to a quick 2 or 3 goal lead shouldn't have to deal with the game's turbo AI consistently being the ones changing the game's momentum. And it's exceptionally easy to see the different bounces and deflections that occur when the AI is involved in the play. The game physics changes. Pucks frequently bounce straight back to them or a teammate off of pokes, hits, deflections or rebounds. They're impervious to contact.

    AI is horrendously broken in the game.

    Drop-ins are a great place to get used to online team play. We all have to start somewhere. You can be a pro at head-to-head or single-player modes, but when you get a group of humans together, the game plays very differently. It takes time to learn how to play effectively with other humans. There's also the On-Ice Trainer to help out newer players.

    There is no momentum that boosts one team over the other. The physics are not changing for AI players as well. They are bound to the same physics as everyone else. Discussing momentum of this nature is against the rules. Please keep this in mind as you run the risk of receiving a suspension or ban for breaking the rules.
    You and I both know the AI are hilariously broken in this game. They cheat. Their animations, their speed, their endurance and their ability to separate while under pressure is completely different than that of a human character's. And when the leash is off and they're forced to adjust to two or three human players that knock them out of position and run them on an a aggressive forecheck, they go turbo and can give even an average player a massive competitive advantage.

    My favorite moment was an an AI controlled RD jumping over to the left side of the DZ ahead of his human teammate to dump a puck on a PK, only to beat everyone to that puck behind the opposing team's net.

    Love the threat of the ban. I'm using this forum as an opportunity to display my disgust for the half-cooked project I paid full ticket price for. Instead of listening to the customer, you're doubling down to blindly defend it. And that's just convincing me that EA's next project won't be any better.

    The AI are not cheating. Yes, they are very precise with their movements though. However, they still have energy like every other player. They are good about managing that energy whereas most humans hustle any chance they get. I'm not saying the AI players are perfect or make the best decisions every time, but this goes for humans in drop-ins as well. I'm just saying the AI aren't cheating.
  • EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    No they aren't. Their animations after contact are significantly shorter. The 'bumps' that are extremely effective against human players are useless against AI. Their reaction time is reduced and their ability to anticipate the play is based on reading the human player's inputs. Their impact on the game is also heavily impacted by the games built-in 'momentum'. They're very fortunate when it comes to loose or bouncing pucks and they complete passes at an almost 100% rate.

    Drop-in teams generally have poor chemistry so they do a poor job of anticipating their teammates. So the logic of trying to play through several of the game's turbo CPU sprites is generally how teams regularly turn their wins into losses.

    Another thing ragging the puck exposes is how poorly the game's defensive strategies are executed by the AI. And this is coming from a defenseman who doesn't do it often, nor do they abuse the LT exploit.

    There is no built in momentum.

    Yes, they also have fast reaction times, but that also depends on their overall. Humans can complete passes at 100% rate as well. That's dependent on your aim and finding open lanes. They also know how to position themselves to pick up loose pucks. Many humans just skate to the puck as quick as possible without noticing how it's bouncing and position themselves to have a better chance to pick it up.

    I agree with the ragging from the AI. It's very annoying, but they are doing it to open up passing lanes. It's something that happens in the real world as well. You see defenders retreat with the puck to set up a breakout. The more you chase them, the more you cut off their options so they continue to retreat. I usually back off and let them begin to breakout and then pressure the carrier. Regardless, they are still playing according to the same game mechanics as everyone else.

    I know you can also pass at 100%. We're talking about World of Chel drop-ins though. These are games where most of the time there are at least two or three players who don't even know where they need to be defensively. It took me years to refine my passing in these games. And this game mode is full of people who just downloaded the game off of Game Pass. Expecting them to know the nuances of the game's passing system and have them skating the correct routes is a massive stretch. More often then not they'll try to skate in a straight line through defenders, often resulting in frequent turnovers.

    A team that gets out to a quick 2 or 3 goal lead shouldn't have to deal with the game's turbo AI consistently being the ones changing the game's momentum. And it's exceptionally easy to see the different bounces and deflections that occur when the AI is involved in the play. The game physics changes. Pucks frequently bounce straight back to them or a teammate off of pokes, hits, deflections or rebounds. They're impervious to contact.

    AI is horrendously broken in the game.

    Drop-ins are a great place to get used to online team play. We all have to start somewhere. You can be a pro at head-to-head or single-player modes, but when you get a group of humans together, the game plays very differently. It takes time to learn how to play effectively with other humans. There's also the On-Ice Trainer to help out newer players.

    There is no momentum that boosts one team over the other. The physics are not changing for AI players as well. They are bound to the same physics as everyone else. Discussing momentum of this nature is against the rules. Please keep this in mind as you run the risk of receiving a suspension or ban for breaking the rules.
    You and I both know the AI are hilariously broken in this game. They cheat. Their animations, their speed, their endurance and their ability to separate while under pressure is completely different than that of a human character's. And when the leash is off and they're forced to adjust to two or three human players that knock them out of position and run them on an a aggressive forecheck, they go turbo and can give even an average player a massive competitive advantage.

    My favorite moment was an an AI controlled RD jumping over to the left side of the DZ ahead of his human teammate to dump a puck on a PK, only to beat everyone to that puck behind the opposing team's net.

    Love the threat of the ban. I'm using this forum as an opportunity to display my disgust for the half-cooked project I paid full ticket price for. Instead of listening to the customer, you're doubling down to blindly defend it. And that's just convincing me that EA's next project won't be any better.

    The AI are not cheating. Yes, they are very precise with their movements though. However, they still have energy like every other player. They are good about managing that energy whereas most humans hustle any chance they get. I'm not saying the AI players are perfect or make the best decisions every time, but this goes for humans in drop-ins as well. I'm just saying the AI aren't cheating.

    The AI definitely have certain advantages over human players though like reaction time. They obviously don’t make human errors and rarely take penalties too. I’ve also seen AI players do things I’ve never seen a human player do.

    There is a reason why a lot of prefer to play with AI teammates in drop ins and usually have no problem coming back to win a game once their human teammates quit. I know because I’ve done the same.

  • EA_Aljo
    3193 posts EA Community Manager
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    EA_Aljo wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »
    IceLion68 wrote: »
    belair_col wrote: »

    In regards to OP, once the other team's players quit, rag the puck. Skate behind your net and move the puck around based on the team's AI defensive strategy. Play keep away. Eventually the other team's human players will eventually take penalties or straight up quit.

    I would argue this is toxic behaviour

    The alternative is forcing play through AI, who frequently change the outcome of drop-in games. AI don't follow the same limitations as human-controlled characters. They cheat.

    The AI players are bound to the same mechanics of the game as everyone else, but they can be more precise with their movements than most humans. I think It would be good to be able to back out of a game without penalty when there are 2 humans left on the other team with 1 being a goalie.

    No they aren't. Their animations after contact are significantly shorter. The 'bumps' that are extremely effective against human players are useless against AI. Their reaction time is reduced and their ability to anticipate the play is based on reading the human player's inputs. Their impact on the game is also heavily impacted by the games built-in 'momentum'. They're very fortunate when it comes to loose or bouncing pucks and they complete passes at an almost 100% rate.

    Drop-in teams generally have poor chemistry so they do a poor job of anticipating their teammates. So the logic of trying to play through several of the game's turbo CPU sprites is generally how teams regularly turn their wins into losses.

    Another thing ragging the puck exposes is how poorly the game's defensive strategies are executed by the AI. And this is coming from a defenseman who doesn't do it often, nor do they abuse the LT exploit.

    There is no built in momentum.

    Yes, they also have fast reaction times, but that also depends on their overall. Humans can complete passes at 100% rate as well. That's dependent on your aim and finding open lanes. They also know how to position themselves to pick up loose pucks. Many humans just skate to the puck as quick as possible without noticing how it's bouncing and position themselves to have a better chance to pick it up.

    I agree with the ragging from the AI. It's very annoying, but they are doing it to open up passing lanes. It's something that happens in the real world as well. You see defenders retreat with the puck to set up a breakout. The more you chase them, the more you cut off their options so they continue to retreat. I usually back off and let them begin to breakout and then pressure the carrier. Regardless, they are still playing according to the same game mechanics as everyone else.

    I know you can also pass at 100%. We're talking about World of Chel drop-ins though. These are games where most of the time there are at least two or three players who don't even know where they need to be defensively. It took me years to refine my passing in these games. And this game mode is full of people who just downloaded the game off of Game Pass. Expecting them to know the nuances of the game's passing system and have them skating the correct routes is a massive stretch. More often then not they'll try to skate in a straight line through defenders, often resulting in frequent turnovers.

    A team that gets out to a quick 2 or 3 goal lead shouldn't have to deal with the game's turbo AI consistently being the ones changing the game's momentum. And it's exceptionally easy to see the different bounces and deflections that occur when the AI is involved in the play. The game physics changes. Pucks frequently bounce straight back to them or a teammate off of pokes, hits, deflections or rebounds. They're impervious to contact.

    AI is horrendously broken in the game.

    Drop-ins are a great place to get used to online team play. We all have to start somewhere. You can be a pro at head-to-head or single-player modes, but when you get a group of humans together, the game plays very differently. It takes time to learn how to play effectively with other humans. There's also the On-Ice Trainer to help out newer players.

    There is no momentum that boosts one team over the other. The physics are not changing for AI players as well. They are bound to the same physics as everyone else. Discussing momentum of this nature is against the rules. Please keep this in mind as you run the risk of receiving a suspension or ban for breaking the rules.
    You and I both know the AI are hilariously broken in this game. They cheat. Their animations, their speed, their endurance and their ability to separate while under pressure is completely different than that of a human character's. And when the leash is off and they're forced to adjust to two or three human players that knock them out of position and run them on an a aggressive forecheck, they go turbo and can give even an average player a massive competitive advantage.

    My favorite moment was an an AI controlled RD jumping over to the left side of the DZ ahead of his human teammate to dump a puck on a PK, only to beat everyone to that puck behind the opposing team's net.

    Love the threat of the ban. I'm using this forum as an opportunity to display my disgust for the half-cooked project I paid full ticket price for. Instead of listening to the customer, you're doubling down to blindly defend it. And that's just convincing me that EA's next project won't be any better.

    The AI are not cheating. Yes, they are very precise with their movements though. However, they still have energy like every other player. They are good about managing that energy whereas most humans hustle any chance they get. I'm not saying the AI players are perfect or make the best decisions every time, but this goes for humans in drop-ins as well. I'm just saying the AI aren't cheating.

    The AI definitely have certain advantages over human players though like reaction time. They obviously don’t make human errors and rarely take penalties too. I’ve also seen AI players do things I’ve never seen a human player do.

    There is a reason why a lot of prefer to play with AI teammates in drop ins and usually have no problem coming back to win a game once their human teammates quit. I know because I’ve done the same.

    The AI aren't specifically given advantages. They do have quick reaction times though and I definitely know what you mean about how they can dominate when there are more AI than humans on a team. I don't know if any changes are coming for drop-ins in the future, but we'll of course relay any changes here should they happen.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. Sign in or register to get started.