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True Performance Skating

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  • strategg101
    823 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    eric57664 wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    eric57664 wrote: »
    So? What am I doing wrong here? Or did I quiet the birdies?

    Sure. A clip of you using PS on offense in practice really showed us that there's no problem with the way skating w
    eric57664 wrote: »
    CrushNHL wrote: »
    Sigh. Skating WITH the puck is not the problem with TPS.

    So if I make some videos of everything I've done with the puck, but instead without the puck, what will you say next?

    I'll say that's awesome, if you're able to pull it off. But just backskating or walking a line isn't what people are talking about.

    Here's a clip that has a perfect example of exactly what we need to be able to do, and what, to me at least, we aren't able to do consistently in this game.

    Now, what I'm talking about isn't the first sequence in this video -- I just included that because it's a great example of the kind of control NHL players when moving at high speed, and the way they are able to pivot and turn with incredible accuracy, precisely what we don't have. I defy you to chase back on D at full speed, slam on the brakes, and spin perfectly in order to face the puck carrier like that with any kind of consistency.

    The key sequence, though, is the second one. This is Lidstrom, defending against puck carrier on the rush, with a trailer coming -- effectively it's a delayed 2v1. Lidstrom backskates, facing up ice, at first, in order to be able to react if puck carrier decides to cut to the middle or if he sends the puck back to trailer. But as the offensive player gets deeper in the zone, Lidstorm pivots, while continuing to skate and stay even with him, so that he's facing the puck carrier. That puts him in a perfect position to block the pass, which he does:



    Do that in a clip, and I will be impressed. In the old days, VC would have allowed me to pivot to face the puck while skating, just as Lidstrom does. As far as I can tell, there is no way to do it in the new game, without stopping first. But maybe I'm wrong. So just duplicate that and explain how you did it, and I'll have learned something new and important about the game.

    If you have auto backskate off and you're in a glide while backskating and holding L2 and just let go while in that glide you will turn and pivot towards the attacking player. As long as you're going slow enough you can sometimes precisely feather your stick and face him, but you can easily end up turning all the way around and then the forward can easily cut back behind you. When you actually do face the player, you're required to come to a full stop. Which if the player with the puck stops, it's all good. But if he keeps moving all of your momentum is gone. And you also cannot transition into lateral movements.

    Then just based on that hindrance, you need to adjust your gap and when you see the puck carrier move, use your hustle button to get an explosive first step.
    But I don't think bmh is talking about turning your body, but moving laterally as lidstrom does while he's slowly stopping or just slowing down.

    Bmh explicitly says that he's talking about where Lindstrom pivots to face the puck carrier, and in that situation you shouldn't have to come to a complete stop, you should just be able to pivot towards him and transition into a t-push while maintaining a larger gap than normal to account for the difference in speed you'll inevitably have when you pivot into a t push and take away his angle to the front of the net if a pass comes. And the t-push would allow you to be in a better position to make a quick stop in case the forward stops or attempts to cut back up high, or transition out of the t-push into normal forward skating if it looks like the forward is going to continue skating towards the goal line. This scenario is obviously not a full speed situation


    if you dont press up and continue to preas down you continue to backskate

    No **** sherlock. We're talking about squaring up to the puck carrier to be in a better position to block an incoming pass when a forward slows down. When the forward slows down he's doing it to buy some time and usually wait for a trailer but depending on how the defense reacts to his change of speed he has different options. One of them being a centering pass.

    L2 does that!!!!
    if you tap the opposite direction you are moving you gradually slow down. shesh.

    Im guessing another full tilt skater
  • eric57664 wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    eric57664 wrote: »
    So? What am I doing wrong here? Or did I quiet the birdies?

    Sure. A clip of you using PS on offense in practice really showed us that there's no problem with the way skating w
    eric57664 wrote: »
    CrushNHL wrote: »
    Sigh. Skating WITH the puck is not the problem with TPS.

    So if I make some videos of everything I've done with the puck, but instead without the puck, what will you say next?

    I'll say that's awesome, if you're able to pull it off. But just backskating or walking a line isn't what people are talking about.

    Here's a clip that has a perfect example of exactly what we need to be able to do, and what, to me at least, we aren't able to do consistently in this game.

    Now, what I'm talking about isn't the first sequence in this video -- I just included that because it's a great example of the kind of control NHL players when moving at high speed, and the way they are able to pivot and turn with incredible accuracy, precisely what we don't have. I defy you to chase back on D at full speed, slam on the brakes, and spin perfectly in order to face the puck carrier like that with any kind of consistency.

    The key sequence, though, is the second one. This is Lidstrom, defending against puck carrier on the rush, with a trailer coming -- effectively it's a delayed 2v1. Lidstrom backskates, facing up ice, at first, in order to be able to react if puck carrier decides to cut to the middle or if he sends the puck back to trailer. But as the offensive player gets deeper in the zone, Lidstorm pivots, while continuing to skate and stay even with him, so that he's facing the puck carrier. That puts him in a perfect position to block the pass, which he does:



    Do that in a clip, and I will be impressed. In the old days, VC would have allowed me to pivot to face the puck while skating, just as Lidstrom does. As far as I can tell, there is no way to do it in the new game, without stopping first. But maybe I'm wrong. So just duplicate that and explain how you did it, and I'll have learned something new and important about the game.

    If you have auto backskate off and you're in a glide while backskating and holding L2 and just let go while in that glide you will turn and pivot towards the attacking player. As long as you're going slow enough you can sometimes precisely feather your stick and face him, but you can easily end up turning all the way around and then the forward can easily cut back behind you. When you actually do face the player, you're required to come to a full stop. Which if the player with the puck stops, it's all good. But if he keeps moving all of your momentum is gone. And you also cannot transition into lateral movements.

    Then just based on that hindrance, you need to adjust your gap and when you see the puck carrier move, use your hustle button to get an explosive first step.
    But I don't think bmh is talking about turning your body, but moving laterally as lidstrom does while he's slowly stopping or just slowing down.

    Bmh explicitly says that he's talking about where Lindstrom pivots to face the puck carrier, and in that situation you shouldn't have to come to a complete stop, you should just be able to pivot towards him and transition into a t-push while maintaining a larger gap than normal to account for the difference in speed you'll inevitably have when you pivot into a t push and take away his angle to the front of the net if a pass comes. And the t-push would allow you to be in a better position to make a quick stop in case the forward stops or attempts to cut back up high, or transition out of the t-push into normal forward skating if it looks like the forward is going to continue skating towards the goal line. This scenario is obviously not a full speed situation


    if you dont press up and continue to preas down you continue to backskate

    No **** sherlock. We're talking about squaring up to the puck carrier to be in a better position to block an incoming pass when a forward slows down. When the forward slows down he's doing it to buy some time and usually wait for a trailer but depending on how the defense reacts to his change of speed he has different options. One of them being a centering pass.

    L2 does that!!!!
    if you tap the opposite direction you are moving you gradually slow down. shesh.

    I'm not explaining things twice just for you just so you can keep up with the conversation because you are never on on the same page with the rest of the class
  • strategg101
    823 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    deleted
  • wow **** is wrong with this guy.

    I say that just about every time you post.


    feelings mutual.
  • And I do agree, @ColonScoper, it should be easier to transition from skating, slowing down then into PS (or the effects of it).
  • Here's an example of one of the issues I have with vision control. I'm sure one of our local experts is going to assume this is me doing something wrong on the play but stay with me, take the time to read what I'm typing and understand it



    OK so I'm yellow and I'm staying with a forward entering my zone. Just containing him, not being overly aggressive. At 00:05 he drops the puck back to a trailing forward. At 00:06 all I want to do is: from a stationary position, pivot in place and square up to the forward who received the pass. For those of you who are saying to yourselves "Hold L2" - I AM. My defenseman is facing towards 11 o'clock instead of at the puck. Now, I should know better by now that vision control doesn't face you towards the puck in the defensive zone if the puck is in a certain spot or at a particular angle from you, and most of the time just makes you face straight up ice. This will also happen of the puck carrier is behind your net. L2 will NOT pivot your skater to face him. Now, you might be saying "what's the big deal, just use the left stick and turn towards him?" Well that's what I end up doing but you'll notice all of this wasted movement that takes place. Hockey is a fast sport and any coach will tell you, especially at a high level, you don't have time to waste. Also, in this game you're forced to slightly skate towards the direction in which you want to look. I want to just be able to stay stationary and simply pivot to look at it. The reason I want to stay where I am is because after passing the puck, the forward who originally had it heads below the goal line, and if the forward who received the pass would have gave it right back to him, it's a longer distance I have to move to challenge him. And if I'm not square to the puck when he makes the pass, I have to turn 180 degrees instead of 90 degrees that I would have to turn if I was square to the puck. See what I'm saying about wasted movement and efficiency? Also, being square to the puck carrier allows me to be in the best possible angle to block the shot, and allows me to be able to play him to my left and right more easily and efficiently depending if he tries to drive the net to either side.
  • Here's an example of one of the issues I have with vision control. I'm sure one of our local experts is going to assume this is me doing something wrong on the play but stay with me, take the time to read what I'm typing and understand it



    OK so I'm yellow and I'm staying with a forward entering my zone. Just containing him, not being overly aggressive. At 00:05 he drops the puck back to a trailing forward. At 00:06 all I want to do is: from a stationary position, pivot in place and square up to the forward who received the pass. For those of you who are saying to yourselves "Hold L2" - I AM. My defenseman is facing towards 11 o'clock instead of at the puck. Now, I should know better by now that vision control doesn't face you towards the puck in the defensive zone if the puck is in a certain spot or at a particular angle from you, and most of the time just makes you face straight up ice. This will also happen of the puck carrier is behind your net. L2 will NOT pivot your skater to face him. Now, you might be saying "what's the big deal, just use the left stick and turn towards him?" Well that's what I end up doing but you'll notice all of this wasted movement that takes place. Hockey is a fast sport and any coach will tell you, especially at a high level, you don't have time to waste. Also, in this game you're forced to slightly skate towards the direction in which you want to look. I want to just be able to stay stationary and simply pivot to look at it. The reason I want to stay where I am is because after passing the puck, the forward who originally had it heads below the goal line, and if the forward who received the pass would have gave it right back to him, it's a longer distance I have to move to challenge him. And if I'm not square to the puck when he makes the pass, I have to turn 180 degrees instead of 90 degrees that I would have to turn if I was square to the puck. See what I'm saying about wasted movement and efficiency? Also, being square to the puck carrier allows me to be in the best possible angle to block the shot, and allows me to be able to play him to my left and right more easily and efficiently depending if he tries to drive the net to either side.

    First of all, no, you shouldn't "hold" L2. You should glide then press L2 + the direction you want to rotate your body from the backside.

    The problem I see here is that you still consider VC as VC. I consider it skate backwards. So what you should have done here is, when the puck gets passed back, you should have pressed L2 and the 'EXACT' opposite direction to face the puck carrier.

    So if the Puck Carrier is at 2oclock, then you should be pressing L2 + 8oclock to rotate to that direction,,,like so.

    Gliding in slow...
    9af774f7e29a145dde6f994da7a86846.gif

    And now racing in full speed with hustle pressed...
    cb3feda4b897b8d74105c20acdcb5465.gif

    Doesn't matter what speed you're skating, pivoting will always work if you point your **** in the direction you're suppose to.

    So basically you want to think of two things. Whereever you want your face to point, you have to use L2 and point your **** in the opposite direction. Don't forget, this is physics based skating so you need to rotate your body properly.


    As for the 'can't rotate when the puck is behind the net', you mean like this? I'm just stopping in a random position then when I'm planted, press and hold L2.

    61c151cd570c846289ce9bd326420853.gif
  • ColonScoper
    157 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    You're basically proving my point though that vision control should return to what it was and shouldn't primarily be a 'skate backwards button.' Because to have to back up and backskate in the opposite direction I want to face is still wasted movement when you should just be able to pivot in place and look at it. You shouldn't have to skate forward at a skater, or backskate away from a skater to face them. I don't want to have my **** in the goalies face. I don't want to give the puck carrier that much room because if I let him come to me, by the time he's reached me, he's already just outside the crease and if I challenge him, he could either cut around me or do as I said in my previous post and pass it to his teammate behind the goal line, and then he can walk to the net while I have to stop, turn around, and attempt to take away the front of the net. "Pointing your ****" isn't a stationary pivot. You're backskating.

    And the exact thing you did with the puck behind the net idk there's times where I hold L2 and I won't turn and look at it. Maybe it only really happens when it's outside the trapezoid.

    Edit: I just went into practice mode and tried it outside the trapezoid and I still faced it, so it might have something to do with the puck being stationary, and it's possible that when it's in motion behind the net or in the corners when L2 won't pivot you to look at it. Either that or I'm not stationary myself. Or I'm just imagining that. But in practice mode I just put the puck on the faceoff dot in the zone, and stood to the front right of the net like I am in my in-game footage, and it made me pivot towards it, so I'm inclined to believe that it has something to do with the puck being absolutely still, or possible being loose and not in posession by anyone which is something I've never really payed close attention to

    And why can't you pivot in place like that when the puck is in the position it is in my video? It doesn't make any sense at all that in certain areas of the ice, L2 works as vision control, and at times it doesn't.
    Post edited by ColonScoper on
  • Agreed. I shouldn't have to move my body so far back just to face him. I wasn't saying that it's right, but just saying it is possible to pivot the correct way. Again the mechanic is in the game, it's just not executed properly.

    As you see in the first gif, I'm gliding pretty slow there, yet when I pivot, I have to stop as if I'm skating fast and really need to grind into the ice. I should be able to just quick stop right there on a dime with the speed I was going.

  • ColonScoper
    157 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    Yeah when you mention having to make a hard stop even when traveling slowly, that's what I'm talking about when it comes to efficiency and wasted time. It's something we've discussed in the past, and should be reiterated. It happens in all different kinds of stopping scenarios. That's why I've said EA needs to have more efficient stops and starts based on your speed/momentum.

    Glad we can all be on the same page right now. Well...there's at least one person who isn't, but I also don't think you should have to be 100% stationary to pivot and track the puck. You should be able to transition into a lateral movement while facing the puck as best you can while skating/gliding as long as your speed permits lateral mobility. And then once you're moving laterally, there would be a speed limit set on your skater (because you obviously can't move laterally at the same speed as you can skate forward or backwards) and the only way to accelerate past this hypothetical speed limit would be to release vision control and skate forwards or backwards. The type of lateral movement you'd make would be determined by what speed you're travelling which is what happens in NHL 10 which I think had the most variety as far as lateral animations are concerned by I could be wrong on that point.
    Post edited by ColonScoper on
  • Also in that video I posted, if you don't pay attention to me, and you look at, let's say the AI LD, after the forward drops the puck back to the trailer, the AI basically never turns toward the puck. In fact, his back is facing the puck, and he's looking directly at the skater he's attempting to defend. Not realistic by any stretch of the imagination. Is he going to intercept a pass with his a5s? Just look at how even the AI is struggling to simply rotate. Like how on earth do people come in here and go "skating is fine, you just want the floating back"
  • Pikesburgh
    11 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    I absolutely love TPS. Ever since I played NHL 14, along with 16 and 17, TPS has been terrific. 14 was the best, because (didn't play 13) people were still adjusting to it. It came so naturally to me because it feels just like real life. Sure there's a couple small tweaks they could do, but it's 99% effective for me. So easier to out skate people on this game.
  • Pikesburgh wrote: »
    I absolutely love TPS. Ever since I played NHL 14, along with 16 and 17, TPS has been terrific. 14 was the best, because (didn't play 13) people were still adjusting to it. It came so naturally to me because it feels just like real life. Sure there's a couple small tweaks they could do, but it's 99% effective for me. So easier to out skate people on this game.

    Obvious forward is obvious
  • cogsx86
    787 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    after the forward drops the puck back to the trailer, the AI basically never turns toward the puck.


    Im not really sure what your referring to here ? Just remember this is a clip in slow motion.

    2mheeft.jpg
    Post edited by cogsx86 on
    You must unlearn what you have learned!
  • eric57664 wrote: »


    Here's a video showing offensively why TPS is garbage. The quick lateral movement of the player with the puck starting at about 0:40 and onward is what I'm talking about. The speed at which he can move, the high agility, the fluidity.

    To do anything similar to this in NHL 17, you have to have the puck while not moving, hold L1 and then you can make sort of similar lateral movements. But if you actually go into a game, or practice and try this, you'll notice the LACK of agility, fluidity, ability to transition back and forth, speed, control etc. And when you try and move to your skaters weak side (left side for a right handed shooter) you'll only initiate a t push. And with that t push you'll notice how little agility you have and how you cannot quickly efficiently transition out of that t-push into other low speed high agility movements. The side steps or shuffles you see in the very beginning of the video are more efficient to move quickly with high agility. A t push would be more useful for a player without the puck who doesn't need to move in a hurry and has time to get there and could be pressure sensitive on the **** as I believe it was prior to TPS. For instance a defenseman at the point could want to t-push from the center of the zone, towards the boards for a pass back to the point while on the powerplay, but doesn't necessarily need to get there immediately.

    Forwards should have this ability in their skating arsenal all while facing the top of the crease to generate scoring chances and to get the defense to over commit. And defense should be able to mirror these exact movements without the puck all while maintaining squareness to the puck. Again in a FLUID, QUICK, PRECISE, RESPONSIVE MANNER WITH HIGH AGILITY AND CONTROL WITHOUT TAPPING THE **** ALL OVER THE PLACE. The ability to quickly change your mind and transition into a forward, backskate, or laterally in the opposite direction. These are lower to low-medium speed movements that right now you literally cannot accomplish with the current skating engine. These movements should take no thinking or skill to perform with a game controller. You should just be able to hold vision control and track the puck while being able to perform these movements and maintaining squareness to the puck. The only thing I can compare it to is the "jockeying" feature in FIFA, but in NHL the only function it would serve is to maintain squareness, and give you the ability to move laterally. It wouldn't move for you, or maintain your gap for you. That would be left up to the person holding the controller.

    In the end of this video you'll notice that it says the demonstrations are being made by PEEWEE and ATOM players. Not NHLers.

    With 10 players on the ice (of course excluding goalies) no player would ever be doing this as there is real space on the ice to utilize such movement. What you can do with precision skating is exactly why you want here but more used like how real hockey is played.

    Can you stop showing "practice" Allen iverson and please show in game footage of actual gameplay? Because I could just as much show the tv show "stars on ice" and ask why can't I do some twirls? The game to me needs to resemble hockey, not what you can do on skates in practice with nobody else on the ice and with no puck.

    Can you take anything more out of context, please?

    I just wish I could do tug o war there in that vid in NHL 18. New feature ea. Add it.

    But some doosh will talk about skating when he's a goalie. (Let's call him....well doosh, still, because he knows who he is....huehuehuehue!!)

    I've been following your posts in this thread for the past couple of pages and one thing sticks out to me in your responses to legitimate videos posted: you can't recognize how hockey skating drills relate to in-game scenarios. Your mind can't comprehend the fact that all of the skating elements shown in these training videos are executed countless times from game to game in short bursts. Furthermore, this illustrates your lack of experience in going through these drills yourself and HAVING to translate them to real live-game scenarios to be an effective hockey player. I'm sure you get the gist of what I'm saying, right?

    The farce that is precision skating is clearly illustrated by the fact that nobody (and I mean nobody) uses it during online games. It's simply not smooth enough to transition in and out of. Fact: trying to enter "precision skating" leaves your player EXTREMELY vulnerable and leaves you almost zero time to do anything once you get into it.

    0% of top players in any game mode use precision skating effectively. That says a lot about the feature, no?
  • Santini3 wrote: »
    eric57664 wrote: »


    Here's a video showing offensively why TPS is garbage. The quick lateral movement of the player with the puck starting at about 0:40 and onward is what I'm talking about. The speed at which he can move, the high agility, the fluidity.

    To do anything similar to this in NHL 17, you have to have the puck while not moving, hold L1 and then you can make sort of similar lateral movements. But if you actually go into a game, or practice and try this, you'll notice the LACK of agility, fluidity, ability to transition back and forth, speed, control etc. And when you try and move to your skaters weak side (left side for a right handed shooter) you'll only initiate a t push. And with that t push you'll notice how little agility you have and how you cannot quickly efficiently transition out of that t-push into other low speed high agility movements. The side steps or shuffles you see in the very beginning of the video are more efficient to move quickly with high agility. A t push would be more useful for a player without the puck who doesn't need to move in a hurry and has time to get there and could be pressure sensitive on the **** as I believe it was prior to TPS. For instance a defenseman at the point could want to t-push from the center of the zone, towards the boards for a pass back to the point while on the powerplay, but doesn't necessarily need to get there immediately.

    Forwards should have this ability in their skating arsenal all while facing the top of the crease to generate scoring chances and to get the defense to over commit. And defense should be able to mirror these exact movements without the puck all while maintaining squareness to the puck. Again in a FLUID, QUICK, PRECISE, RESPONSIVE MANNER WITH HIGH AGILITY AND CONTROL WITHOUT TAPPING THE **** ALL OVER THE PLACE. The ability to quickly change your mind and transition into a forward, backskate, or laterally in the opposite direction. These are lower to low-medium speed movements that right now you literally cannot accomplish with the current skating engine. These movements should take no thinking or skill to perform with a game controller. You should just be able to hold vision control and track the puck while being able to perform these movements and maintaining squareness to the puck. The only thing I can compare it to is the "jockeying" feature in FIFA, but in NHL the only function it would serve is to maintain squareness, and give you the ability to move laterally. It wouldn't move for you, or maintain your gap for you. That would be left up to the person holding the controller.

    In the end of this video you'll notice that it says the demonstrations are being made by PEEWEE and ATOM players. Not NHLers.

    With 10 players on the ice (of course excluding goalies) no player would ever be doing this as there is real space on the ice to utilize such movement. What you can do with precision skating is exactly why you want here but more used like how real hockey is played.

    Can you stop showing "practice" Allen iverson and please show in game footage of actual gameplay? Because I could just as much show the tv show "stars on ice" and ask why can't I do some twirls? The game to me needs to resemble hockey, not what you can do on skates in practice with nobody else on the ice and with no puck.

    Can you take anything more out of context, please?

    I just wish I could do tug o war there in that vid in NHL 18. New feature ea. Add it.

    But some doosh will talk about skating when he's a goalie. (Let's call him....well doosh, still, because he knows who he is....huehuehuehue!!)

    I've been following your posts in this thread for the past couple of pages and one thing sticks out to me in your responses to legitimate videos posted: you can't recognize how hockey skating drills relate to in-game scenarios. Your mind can't comprehend the fact that all of the skating elements shown in these training videos are executed countless times from game to game in short bursts. Furthermore, this illustrates your lack of experience in going through these drills yourself and HAVING to translate them to real live-game scenarios to be an effective hockey player. I'm sure you get the gist of what I'm saying, right?

    The farce that is precision skating is clearly illustrated by the fact that nobody (and I mean nobody) uses it during online games. It's simply not smooth enough to transition in and out of. Fact: trying to enter "precision skating" leaves your player EXTREMELY vulnerable and leaves you almost zero time to do anything once you get into it.

    0% of top players in any game mode use precision skating effectively. That says a lot about the feature, no?

    Calm down, he is clearly showing your more then capable of doing skating techniques in game. And practice scenarios dont reflect real game play. Yes they are the building blocks for skating but when it comes to this game your more then capable, to do the required movements to follow the play/
    You must unlearn what you have learned!
  • eric57664
    240 posts Member
    edited October 2016
    COGSx86 wrote: »
    Santini3 wrote: »
    eric57664 wrote: »


    Here's a video showing offensively why TPS is garbage. The quick lateral movement of the player with the puck starting at about 0:40 and onward is what I'm talking about. The speed at which he can move, the high agility, the fluidity.

    To do anything similar to this in NHL 17, you have to have the puck while not moving, hold L1 and then you can make sort of similar lateral movements. But if you actually go into a game, or practice and try this, you'll notice the LACK of agility, fluidity, ability to transition back and forth, speed, control etc. And when you try and move to your skaters weak side (left side for a right handed shooter) you'll only initiate a t push. And with that t push you'll notice how little agility you have and how you cannot quickly efficiently transition out of that t-push into other low speed high agility movements. The side steps or shuffles you see in the very beginning of the video are more efficient to move quickly with high agility. A t push would be more useful for a player without the puck who doesn't need to move in a hurry and has time to get there and could be pressure sensitive on the **** as I believe it was prior to TPS. For instance a defenseman at the point could want to t-push from the center of the zone, towards the boards for a pass back to the point while on the powerplay, but doesn't necessarily need to get there immediately.

    Forwards should have this ability in their skating arsenal all while facing the top of the crease to generate scoring chances and to get the defense to over commit. And defense should be able to mirror these exact movements without the puck all while maintaining squareness to the puck. Again in a FLUID, QUICK, PRECISE, RESPONSIVE MANNER WITH HIGH AGILITY AND CONTROL WITHOUT TAPPING THE **** ALL OVER THE PLACE. The ability to quickly change your mind and transition into a forward, backskate, or laterally in the opposite direction. These are lower to low-medium speed movements that right now you literally cannot accomplish with the current skating engine. These movements should take no thinking or skill to perform with a game controller. You should just be able to hold vision control and track the puck while being able to perform these movements and maintaining squareness to the puck. The only thing I can compare it to is the "jockeying" feature in FIFA, but in NHL the only function it would serve is to maintain squareness, and give you the ability to move laterally. It wouldn't move for you, or maintain your gap for you. That would be left up to the person holding the controller.

    In the end of this video you'll notice that it says the demonstrations are being made by PEEWEE and ATOM players. Not NHLers.

    With 10 players on the ice (of course excluding goalies) no player would ever be doing this as there is real space on the ice to utilize such movement. What you can do with precision skating is exactly why you want here but more used like how real hockey is played.

    Can you stop showing "practice" Allen iverson and please show in game footage of actual gameplay? Because I could just as much show the tv show "stars on ice" and ask why can't I do some twirls? The game to me needs to resemble hockey, not what you can do on skates in practice with nobody else on the ice and with no puck.

    Can you take anything more out of context, please?

    I just wish I could do tug o war there in that vid in NHL 18. New feature ea. Add it.

    But some doosh will talk about skating when he's a goalie. (Let's call him....well doosh, still, because he knows who he is....huehuehuehue!!)

    I've been following your posts in this thread for the past couple of pages and one thing sticks out to me in your responses to legitimate videos posted: you can't recognize how hockey skating drills relate to in-game scenarios. Your mind can't comprehend the fact that all of the skating elements shown in these training videos are executed countless times from game to game in short bursts. Furthermore, this illustrates your lack of experience in going through these drills yourself and HAVING to translate them to real live-game scenarios to be an effective hockey player. I'm sure you get the gist of what I'm saying, right?

    The farce that is precision skating is clearly illustrated by the fact that nobody (and I mean nobody) uses it during online games. It's simply not smooth enough to transition in and out of. Fact: trying to enter "precision skating" leaves your player EXTREMELY vulnerable and leaves you almost zero time to do anything once you get into it.

    0% of top players in any game mode use precision skating effectively. That says a lot about the feature, no?

    Calm down, he is clearly showing your more then capable of doing skating techniques in game. And practice scenarios dont reflect real game play. Yes they are the building blocks for skating but when it comes to this game your more then capable, to do the required movements to follow the play/

    Ya exactly. He doesn't seem to understand that. It's like he never pulled on a pair of skates. Building blocks to skating, but not directly to hockey playing. And he said I can't fathom that? The guy is funny.

    It's just another who reads half of the thread and responds to it. "Very smart."

    I would have responded to him directly but when he said "I've been follwing your posts for the past couple of pages", you can see a half glass kind of empty type of person here.

    Some advice @Santini3, please read everything before responding, and when it comes to not comprehending, it's clear you don't get what I meant. Should I put it down in laments terms for you? So do you get the gist of what I'm saying?

    Next time try not to come off as a condescending little **** and join the conversation like a mature person.

    Shameful.
  • eric57664 wrote: »
    Agreed. I shouldn't have to move my body so far back just to face him. I wasn't saying that it's right, but just saying it is possible to pivot the correct way. Again the mechanic is in the game, it's just not executed properly.

    As you see in the first gif, I'm gliding pretty slow there, yet when I pivot, I have to stop as if I'm skating fast and really need to grind into the ice. I should be able to just quick stop right there on a dime with the speed I was going.

    I still don't see how the mechanic "is in the game." What you show in those two clips is that you can turn 180 degrees using LT -- in the first clip, you basically go from facing down ice to up ice -- and that in some cases, if you come to a complete stop, you can turn 160 degrees or whatever.

    But this only works if you're playing defense by skating next to -- or chasing -- the puck carrier. If you're already backskating on defense (not with ABS on, but rather holding LT), and you want to pivot to face him without stopping, either to block a pass (as Lidstrom does in the clip I posted) or to be in a better position to block a shot, what you do in that clip doesn't help you. And none of the clips you've posted show a player pivoting while backskating (so that he's then, in effect, skating at an angle while facing the puck).

    I know I can let go of LT. But that doesn't actually pivot me -- it rotates me to where I'm facing down ice again. I can use that as a kludgy way to pivot, stopping the rotation when I'm facing roughly where I want to face, but that's not the kind of purposeful, intentional pivot you see NHL players make all the time.

    CS has it right -- "you should be able to transition into a lateral movement while facing the puck as best you can while skating/gliding as long as your speed permits lateral mobility." I shouldn't have to be stopped in order to pivot to face the puck.

    And on whether you pivot toward the puck when you hit LT when stopped, you can't use free-skate practice clips to show this, because in free skate you're on offense. We all know that on offense without the puck, hitting LT when stopped leads you to face the puck. But on defense in the zone, in my experience it doesn't work anywhere near that consistently.
  • COGSx86 wrote: »
    after the forward drops the puck back to the trailer, the AI basically never turns toward the puck.


    Im not really sure what your referring to here ? Just remember this is a clip in slow motion.

    2mheeft.jpg

    I'm referencing the rest of the **** video where the AI literally has his back to the puck. Why I'm even responding to this ridiculous post, I have no idea.
  • COGSx86 wrote: »
    after the forward drops the puck back to the trailer, the AI basically never turns toward the puck.


    Im not really sure what your referring to here ? Just remember this is a clip in slow motion.

    2mheeft.jpg

    I'm referencing the rest of the **** video where the AI literally has his back to the puck. Why I'm even responding to this ridiculous post, I have no idea.

    Seriously ? You showed the clip in slow motion, you expect the BOT to turn as fast as the puck goes to the point ?
    You must unlearn what you have learned!
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