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Gameplay Updates Based on Beta Tuner Rollback Feedback

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  • Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.
    BlahQz - Owner of WikkiD6 - PS4
  • BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.

    Again, he's already covering for the RD. And even if he doesn't realize someone's behind him, he can see the other guy at the hashmarks. So it makes no sense for him to leave the RD spot empty in order to cover for the LD. Either way, one position is going to be empty, and the LD Is a lot closer to being able to cover his position than the completely empty space #91 left behind when he crossed to the other side of the net.
  • VeNOM2099
    3178 posts Member
    edited February 2019
    LW #91 (Anthony Duclair) 's Defensive awareness is 77. RD #4 (Scott Harrington) who left his post to go play forward's defensive awareness is 78. So it's not like #4 would've been a much better option to "defend" and likely the same boneheaded play would've been done by the AI.

    The LD (controlled by the human) wasn't out of position. He was IN his position in front of the puck handler and he was doing what any assigned defenseman would do which is to take the body to his man.

    The only defenseman out of position was #91, because as BMH245 said, he leaves his post to cross over... I don't even think he wanted to hit the player anymore, I think it's more likely the AI was trying to step into the lane of a possible shot which, again, why?? Even if the player shoots instead of passing, the goalie was in good position to stop the shot. There's nothing #91 can do by trying to get in the way of the shot except abandon his post and allow the backdoor scoring chance.

  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    LW #91 (Anthony Duclair) 's Defensive awareness is 77. RD #4 (Scott Harrington) who left his post to go play forward's defensive awareness is 78. So it's not like #4 would've been a much better option to "defend" and likely the same boneheaded play would've been done by the AI.

    The LD (controlled by the human) wasn't out of position. He was IN his position in front of the puck handler and he was doing what any assigned defenseman would do which is to take the body to his man.

    The only defenseman out of position was #91, because as BMH245 said, he leaves his post to cross over... I don't even think he wanted to hit the player anymore, I think it's more likely the AI was trying to step into the lane of a possible shot which, again, why?? Even if the player shoots instead of passing, the goalie was in good position to stop the shot. There's nothing #91 can do by trying to get in the way of the shot except abandon his post and allow the backdoor scoring chance.

    Moral of the story, ai wont bail you out when you make turnovers in the defensive end. I just want to know why 91 crossed over instead of staying there.
  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    The only defenseman out of position was #91, because as BMH245 said, he leaves his post to cross over... I don't even think he wanted to hit the player anymore, I think it's more likely the AI was trying to step into the lane of a possible shot.

    I agree with this, and what makes it an especially bad idea is that, as I said earlier, the player with the puck is right-handed, and has his back turned to the net, which means he has no real chance of getting off a strong shot.
  • Bmh245 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.

    Again, he's already covering for the RD. And even if he doesn't realize someone's behind him, he can see the other guy at the hashmarks. So it makes no sense for him to leave the RD spot empty in order to cover for the LD. Either way, one position is going to be empty, and the LD Is a lot closer to being able to cover his position than the completely empty space #91 left behind when he crossed to the other side of the net.

    Just because the human player switched off of him while he was 'in position for RD' doesn't mean the AI would choose to cover / play that position and / or area. The AI has to gauge the play according to his awareness level.

    In this case he chose "wrong" because the actual RD #4 was present, albeit skating out of position due to the human skating him up ice, but present. So 91 decided to cover for the LD instead.

    Watch #4 the entire clip. Initially after the turnover he is in position. The human player in a scramble to choose the right player chose him and skated him out of position. He then switched to the LD and he made the hit. 91 was in better / closer proximity to the LD so it covered that position.
    BlahQz - Owner of WikkiD6 - PS4
  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    @Bmh245

    Here, I just used this clip in another video about the lack of "creativity" in the game because bumps are OP (apparently).

    fTrdPk9.gif

    Can you spot the error? Was it the human that made it or the AI? What was the correct play to make there? It'll be interesting to see what you (and others say). Although I'm pretty certain as to what your answer is gonna be.

    So I don’t mind this goal, here’s why: the play was turned over on the right side of the ice (from the defensive perspective obviously) and the puck and play then flowed to the left. To me, it looks like #91 got caught up in flowing with the play and the guy that scored ended up getting lost in his blindside.

    I think this play is a pretty realistic representation of a turnover and a forechecker getting lost on the backside. I don’t think the human stepping up with the LD is an “error” because it’s kot, that’s the right play, but the “error” was not taking advantage of the Birdseye view we all get when playing this game and manually switching to the backside D to prevent the goal scorer from getting lost.

    Obviously turning the puck over started this whole play and a small amount of puck poise and play recognition would’ve prevented this as holding onto the puck was the smartest play at the time.

    I understand that we’d all like to have AI play like they have the Birdseye view, but I think it’s better for the game that they don’t. I believe this goal looks real in a hockey perspective way, which is 100% the opposite of the trap scenario we saw the other day. Also, if defensive awareness really impacted this play, that’s great! However, like bmh and venom mentioned, I believe the AI winger/D got lost due to a completely different reason than the scenario I described, but that’s a different discussion imo.

    TL;DR The result looked realistic to me, but I know it happened for the wrong reason.
  • will they change tuner later.. or we are done about tuner..

    honestly i am will well right now with the tuner.. i would like to keep it..

    but i hope if they change something, they will fix one hand goal and wrap around goal.
  • BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.

    Again, he's already covering for the RD. And even if he doesn't realize someone's behind him, he can see the other guy at the hashmarks. So it makes no sense for him to leave the RD spot empty in order to cover for the LD. Either way, one position is going to be empty, and the LD Is a lot closer to being able to cover his position than the completely empty space #91 left behind when he crossed to the other side of the net.

    Just because the human player switched off of him while he was 'in position for RD' doesn't mean the AI would choose to cover / play that position and / or area. The AI has to gauge the play according to his awareness level.

    In this case he chose "wrong" because the actual RD #4 was present, albeit skating out of position due to the human skating him up ice, but present. So 91 decided to cover for the LD instead.

    Watch #4 the entire clip. Initially after the turnover he is in position. The human player in a scramble to choose the right player chose him and skated him out of position. He then switched to the LD and he made the hit. 91 was in better / closer proximity to the LD so it covered that position.

    The human player doesn't skate him (#4) out of position, the game switches to #4 because he had attempted a pass and automatically switched to the receiving player. The only reason he didn't get the puck is because I was there.

    Players switch positions in hockey all the time, and the better teams have players that know how to cover for their teammates in those situations. But even bad players know (or should know) not to blow their position when a possible threat is in front of the net. No matter how you slice it, in position or out of position, the ONLY real option for the AI was to guard against the one-timer by marking the open man in front of the net.

    Instead it chose an EA play, one that MANY human users have been taught by this game and use constantly, namely "get in front of the shot". And then they blame the goalie when he can't slide across and make the save... *smh*
  • Obviously turning the puck over started this whole play and a small amount of puck poise and play recognition would’ve prevented this as holding onto the puck was the smartest play at the time.

    I understand that we’d all like to have AI play like they have the Birdseye view, but I think it’s better for the game that they don’t. I believe this goal looks real in a hockey perspective way, which is 100% the opposite of the trap scenario we saw the other day. Also, if defensive awareness really impacted this play, that’s great! However, like bmh and venom mentioned, I believe the AI winger/D got lost due to a completely different reason than the scenario I described, but that’s a different discussion imo.

    TL;DR The result looked realistic to me, but I know it happened for the wrong reason.

    The actual play I would've done is passed it sooner to #4. If he had done that, he would've hit the blue line and I would've been in a precarious situation as I probably couldn't have attempted a poke check for fear of getting a penalty, and he would've been able to go up the ice averting the situation that happened instead.

    As for the LW/D (#91) he certainly wouldn't have spotted the guy behind him although a little hockey knowledge (keep your head on a swivel) would've made him try to look, just in case. Regardless he most CERTAINLY spotted the player near the slot who was in his view. So why didn't he at least cover that option which would've still been bad, but not as catastrophic as what he did?

  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.

    Again, he's already covering for the RD. And even if he doesn't realize someone's behind him, he can see the other guy at the hashmarks. So it makes no sense for him to leave the RD spot empty in order to cover for the LD. Either way, one position is going to be empty, and the LD Is a lot closer to being able to cover his position than the completely empty space #91 left behind when he crossed to the other side of the net.

    Just because the human player switched off of him while he was 'in position for RD' doesn't mean the AI would choose to cover / play that position and / or area. The AI has to gauge the play according to his awareness level.

    In this case he chose "wrong" because the actual RD #4 was present, albeit skating out of position due to the human skating him up ice, but present. So 91 decided to cover for the LD instead.

    Watch #4 the entire clip. Initially after the turnover he is in position. The human player in a scramble to choose the right player chose him and skated him out of position. He then switched to the LD and he made the hit. 91 was in better / closer proximity to the LD so it covered that position.

    The human player doesn't skate him (#4) out of position, the game switches to #4 because he had attempted a pass and automatically switched to the receiving player. The only reason he didn't get the puck is because I was there.

    Players switch positions in hockey all the time, and the better teams have players that know how to cover for their teammates in those situations. But even bad players know (or should know) not to blow their position when a possible threat is in front of the net. No matter how you slice it, in position or out of position, the ONLY real option for the AI was to guard against the one-timer by marking the open man in front of the net.

    Instead it chose an EA play, one that MANY human users have been taught by this game and use constantly, namely "get in front of the shot". And then they blame the goalie when he can't slide across and make the save... *smh*

    Nah man. After he gains control of the puck with #4 and passes it up to #91 who delivers the pass that gets intercepted the control player switches to the player leaving the zone briefly. That player is not #4, it's #10. The human player tried to switch players (while still skating up ice after controlling #10 briefly due to the pass fail) and it chose the RD #4 again, thus skating him out of position, and the rest of the farce ensued.

    Now, if the game randomly changes your player after a failed pass attempt your conclusion would make more sense. I don't think the game does this though. I think if you try to make a pass and it fails your control switches and stays to the player meant for the pass. If @NHLDEV could confirm this either way it would be nice.

    I do agree that irl players switch positions all the time and should fill in but in this case (a defensive scramble situation) with the human player pulling people out of position combined with factoring in the AI's awareness levels (especially #91 with a 77 def awareness) I can see why the AI did what it did. with a split second to choose.
    BlahQz - Owner of WikkiD6 - PS4
  • Don't mean to break up this amazing discussion about AI, but any high end 3s players seeing a very high influx of one-handed tuck goals? Seeing s lot connect from the side net angle as well as a lot of people trying it over and over again.
  • NHLDev
    1680 posts EA NHL Developer
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    BlahQGhozT wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    You (and everyone else) are assuming #91 has a high defensive awareness. It is likely is isn't high so it 'didn't notice' the correct defensive play behind him to make to cover the net / slot to stop the pass. It instead just tried to cover for the LD who was going to be out of position due to the step up hit.

    Again, he's already covering for the RD. And even if he doesn't realize someone's behind him, he can see the other guy at the hashmarks. So it makes no sense for him to leave the RD spot empty in order to cover for the LD. Either way, one position is going to be empty, and the LD Is a lot closer to being able to cover his position than the completely empty space #91 left behind when he crossed to the other side of the net.

    Just because the human player switched off of him while he was 'in position for RD' doesn't mean the AI would choose to cover / play that position and / or area. The AI has to gauge the play according to his awareness level.

    In this case he chose "wrong" because the actual RD #4 was present, albeit skating out of position due to the human skating him up ice, but present. So 91 decided to cover for the LD instead.

    Watch #4 the entire clip. Initially after the turnover he is in position. The human player in a scramble to choose the right player chose him and skated him out of position. He then switched to the LD and he made the hit. 91 was in better / closer proximity to the LD so it covered that position.

    The human player doesn't skate him (#4) out of position, the game switches to #4 because he had attempted a pass and automatically switched to the receiving player. The only reason he didn't get the puck is because I was there.

    Players switch positions in hockey all the time, and the better teams have players that know how to cover for their teammates in those situations. But even bad players know (or should know) not to blow their position when a possible threat is in front of the net. No matter how you slice it, in position or out of position, the ONLY real option for the AI was to guard against the one-timer by marking the open man in front of the net.

    Instead it chose an EA play, one that MANY human users have been taught by this game and use constantly, namely "get in front of the shot". And then they blame the goalie when he can't slide across and make the save... *smh*

    Nah man. After he gains control of the puck with #4 and passes it up to #91 who delivers the pass that gets intercepted the control player switches to the player leaving the zone briefly. That player is not #4, it's #10. The human player tried to switch players (while still skating up ice after controlling #10 briefly due to the pass fail) and it chose the RD #4 again, thus skating him out of position, and the rest of the farce ensued.

    Now, if the game randomly changes your player after a failed pass attempt your conclusion would make more sense. I don't think the game does this though. I think if you try to make a pass and it fails your control switches and stays to the player meant for the pass. If @NHLDEV could confirm this either way it would be nice.

    I do agree that irl players switch positions all the time and should fill in but in this case (a defensive scramble situation) with the human player pulling people out of position combined with factoring in the AI's awareness levels (especially #91 with a 77 def awareness) I can see why the AI did what it did. with a split second to choose.

    Your assessment is correct. The player switched again and pulled that player out of position. The game would switch to the attempted receiver on the pass but not again unless the player asked for it.
  • NHLDev wrote: »
    The player switched again and pulled that player out of position. The game would switch to the attempted receiver on the pass but not again unless the player asked for it.


    Exactly. Thank You.
  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    Exactly! Whether he's the LW, RW or C, he swapped positions to cover for the Defenseman (#4) who jumped up on offense. So now his coverage is that of a defender, not a forward.

    You want the AI to recognize that it needs to act as a different position here (LW becomes RD).
    But in the 1-4 situation where the Center (the 1) backs into his D, you dont want any of the 4 to ever think the C is now in their position and rotate elsewhere.

    Which should they do? Recognize position change, or not?
    EASHL player
  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    Exactly! Whether he's the LW, RW or C, he swapped positions to cover for the Defenseman (#4) who jumped up on offense. So now his coverage is that of a defender, not a forward.

    You want the AI to recognize that it needs to act as a different position here (LW becomes RD).
    But in the 1-4 situation where the Center (the 1) backs into his D, you dont want any of the 4 to ever think the C is now in their position and rotate elsewhere.

    Which should they do? Recognize position change, or not?

    You're willfully missing the point.

    In the 1-4 situations, the LW is playing his position. And he does not "recognize a position change" - he typically chooses to make the position change on its own, in order to cover a coverage hole that does not exist.

    In Venom's clip, the LW is going to be out of position either way - whether it stays to cover RD or moves over to the left of the net. So there needs to be a sensible reason for him to change positions at that point - and in that video, there isn't.

    The point is that in both cases, the AI decides to abandon a good defensive position because of some inscrutable, and ill-conceived, logic. That's what needs to be fixed.

    Look at this clip:



    It's, again, a 1-4. Center pressures the puck carrier, as he's supposed to do. LD passes the puck to RD. The LW is covering the opposing RW but then, for some bizarre reason, skates all the way to the middle of the ice, so he can stand in front of the two defensemen, leaving a completely free pass to the opposing RW and a free zone entry. Only the RD's odd decision to do a between-the-legs deke allows the C to catch up and poke the puck away.

    The C is playing his position appropriately in a 1-4 - there is no human error. The LW is covering a hole that doesn't exist, and creating a coverage hole by abandoning the RW. (The craziest part of it is that he only starts to skate to the middle after the play switches to his side of the ice.) It's ridiculous AI behavior, and it should be fixed.
  • As for @KidShowtime1867's idea that somehow it's a mistake if the pressuring center allows a passing lane to the opposing center behind him, and therefore the LW is justified in sliding over, check out this clip:



    Now, this is a 1-3-1. Center pressures the puck carrier in exactly the same way as the previous clip, and just as in the previous clip, LD passes the puck to RD.

    This time, though, the LW plays his position. So the RD passes to his center (which is supposedly a mistake to allow, per KidShowtime). And what happens? My defenseman is in position - he steps up at the blue line. Center runs into him and loses the puck - turnover.

    That's exactly how the trap is supposed to work. But the only reason it does is because the LW does the sensible thing and plays his position - in stark contrast to what he does in all the other clips.
  • VeNOM2099 wrote: »
    Bmh245 wrote: »
    We often yell at the AI for going out of their position to cover for another player, and here we yell at the AI (LWer #91) for not staying out of their position to cover net front.
    This argument now might be that the LWer should've recognized he was now RD and held crease front.

    If #91 was the LW (I have no idea how you know he was the LW rather than the RW or C), he's already covering for another player (the RD). And the LD is actually in position. So there's no logic in the LW skating from one spot where he's out of position to another, especially since skating to the other side of the net, he leaves someone completely open at the far post.

    Exactly! Whether he's the LW, RW or C, he swapped positions to cover for the Defenseman (#4) who jumped up on offense. So now his coverage is that of a defender, not a forward.

    You want the AI to recognize that it needs to act as a different position here (LW becomes RD).
    But in the 1-4 situation where the Center (the 1) backs into his D, you dont want any of the 4 to ever think the C is now in their position and rotate elsewhere.

    Which should they do? Recognize position change, or not?

    The 1-4 happens before the blue line, once the puck enters the zone defense should be either man-to-man or zone coverage where the C can act as the lone chaser or not.

    But here, let's put up the full clip so we can get a better look at what happened:

    xPcDUsd.gif

    So after the zone incursion, Smith's shot misses and hits the backboard. Pageau tries to pick it up but (for some reason) fails to pick up the puck and it's instead picked up by Harrington (#4). Harrington then passes to Duclair (#91) who's skating wide and towards the boards. He receives the puck, bounces off like he's on a trampoline (great job EA), and HERE is where the mistake is made, he holds on to the puck too long and tries to hit Alexander Wennberg (#10) who does the correct play and steps up to where Duclair's position should've been.

    Here's where things get tricky and we start to assume what the human was trying to do. You (and Ben) are right that he switches off once he notices the pass gets intercepted. But see how immediately when he takes control of Harrington, he starts to veer to the left (his right) because he thought he was going to take control of Brandon Dubinsky (#17) who should've been the player he took control of as he was in a better position to pressure Borowiecki. But if we go a few frames before he took control of Harrington, you see that the AI was already gunning Harrington directly at the puck holder when he had no business rushing out of position like that. So the human gets control of the wrong player, goes in the wrong direction and gets smoked. Then he tries to correct the mistake and takes control of Savard (#58) who's directly in front of the puck holder which is now Pageau, who's on his backhand. At this point, the situation isn't so dire, because he has a player in position in front of a possible shooter and Duclair (#91) is in between the hashmarks, in position to cut off the pass or grab a rebound if a shot is taken. The only threat at this point is Pajaarvi (#56) who if he gets the pass, has a good clear shot from near the slot. But all Duclair has to do is take one step to the Left (his right) and the situation is defused. Pajaarvi's only choice at that point would be to pass to Smith waiting by the post, but by then the goalie would likely have had enough time to slide over and cover the post.

    So the only human error here, is that he got the wrong player when he switched players the first time after the pass gets intercepted. And only because the AI decides to charge the D-man towards the puck holder, when his forward was in a better position to pressure him and so the more logical choice to consider for a switch off. And then the AI makes another boneheaded mistake in taking Duclair out of position again to try to get in front of Pageau's shot.

    That's how I read that play.
  • MooseHunter10
    402 posts Member
    edited February 2019
    Im with you that the LW keeps making that same terrible play in your faceoff clips, and that he shouldnt.

    Im also with you that the defensive AI often decides to abandon the cross crease pass option.

    My only contention is the trigger for the AI's mistakes. Those post-faceoff plays don't really show any attempt by your AI to setup a 1-4. They look to be protecting lanes to the net, and not defending the zone entry at all. I suspect that they're trying to defend what they see as a fast-break, and not establish their system. Possible that teams switch strategies only when zones are entered/exited, and as they didnt pull back beyond their blueline, the 1-4 was never triggered.

    Could you lock on as another player on your team (RW?), and see what the game expects the Center to do with your current strategies?

    My biggest beef with AI (in EASHL) is the AI D thinking I swapped positions with them when I sink low with a forward, and then that AI D trying to play as a forward for that shift. Likewise an AI winger playing the wrong side an entire shift. Maybe Im trying to pigeon hole my problem into yours, and you're right that its a straight up logic error, and nothing to do with AI switching positions based on human positioning.

    Re: abandon cross crease, I think a recent tuner change made the goalies play the shooter more and the pass less. Was it forgotten to adjust the ai d's preference to play the pass more in compensation?
    EASHL player
  • KidShowtime1867
    1440 posts Member
    edited February 2019
    I'm pretty certain the 1-4 is causing the defenders to back up after the faceoff loss- whereas the 1-3-1 makes your defenders step up:

    At the exact moment the RD receives the puck:

    1-3-1:

    TsW0brD.png


    1-4


    O93laza.png

    I think the gap difference with the 1-4 gives the player time to assess the danger and covers up the mistake by the center.

    1-3-1 , there's less gap and less time for the winger to make that decision.


    You're also flat out attacking the puck carrier. It's not really 'pressure'.

    After the faceoff loss, the center should pressure the puck carrier and also utilize DSS to eliminate options. DSS wasn't used here and that could be considered the error.
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