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Forum Grammar

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  • LennyAdd
    514 posts
    edited November 2013
    But sum of us is collige graduates. We gradiacted frum collige.

    Some of my recent favorites have been:

    Holloween
    Baloon
    Their/There
    Alot
    Costomers
    Calling Native Americans Indians, last time I checked I was of Native American blood, not from India.

    Actually, here in Portugal, and maybe Spain too, we call native americans "?ndios" because when Christopher Columbus arrived in America, he thought he had reached India. People from India are called "indianos". So maybe that's why some people call them indians.
  • swdonnelly84
    639 posts New member
    edited November 2013
    You forgot to, too and two.

    Great topic though!

    Oh, and I love when people say I'm typing on a small keypad so spelling is overlooked. Yup, that makes sense.
  • ecneralc
    3182 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    LennyAdd wrote:
    But sum of us is collige graduates. We gradiacted frum collige.

    Some of my recent favorites have been:

    Holloween
    Baloon
    Their/There
    Alot
    Costomers
    Calling Native Americans Indians, last time I checked I was of Native American blood, not from India.

    Actually, here in Portugal, and maybe Spain too, we call native americans "?ndios" because when Christopher Columbus arrived in America, he thought he had reached India. People from India are called "indianos". So maybe that's why some people call them indians.

    Was savages or Indians originally. It's now considered racist to call a Native American or aboriginal person an Indian in North America.
  • Pull_Up_A_Chair
    896 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    A lot - two words. It is a phrase.

    Their - This is simple. It's what happens when people are referred to. An example: "Their house is over here"

    There - Indicates where/what something is. As in "that thing is over there."

    They're - They are. As in "they are going somewhere"

    It's - It is. As in "it's great you're here"

    Its - Possessive. As in "The dog took its bone"

    You're - You are. as in "You're looking great"

    Your - Possessive. As in "Your house is over there"

    Just remember...
    A LOT IS A PHRASE.
    total fail, this is not a grammar lesson but a spelling lesson

    Wrong again. But please, elaborate for my pleasure. If you don't mind. I mean, if you have the time.
  • Bart-man5674
    1633 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    I'm late but it don't matter if you type some words wrong it's a forum get over it
  • direwolf987
    7450 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    I'm waiting on the Who vs. Whom lesson. Is that next week?
  • adidas4fun68
    939 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    A lot - two words. It is a phrase.

    Their - This is simple. It's what happens when people are referred to. An example: "Their house is over here"

    There - Indicates where/what something is. As in "that thing is over there."

    They're - They are. As in "they are going somewhere"

    It's - It is. As in "it's great you're here"

    Its - Possessive. As in "The dog took its bone"

    You're - You are. as in "You're looking great"

    Your - Possessive. As in "Your house is over there"

    Just remember...
    A LOT IS A PHRASE.
    total fail, this is not a grammar lesson but a spelling lesson

    Wrong again. But please, elaborate for my pleasure. If you don't mind. I mean, if you have the time.
    you can say it all you like, you wont get marks for repeating the same mistake over and over
  • adidas4fun68
    939 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    wikipedia wrote:
    In linguistics, grammar is the set of structural rules that governs the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. ....... The term grammar is often used by non-linguists with a very broad meaning.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammar

    And the net is full of "experts" claiming using the incorrect homophone is bad grammar. It is not, the word is placed in the correct manner in the sentence structure - it is just that it is spelt wrong for its intended meaning within that sentence. That is a spelling mistake and not a grammar mistake.

    Let the pseuds continue their pretensions.
  • datasurgeon
    1878 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    I remember sentence diagramming. Grabbing dangling participles and pulling them back before they fell into oblivion.


    Aw good times.


    So is there a pop quiz at the end of this thread?



    post 998
  • Arlandria606
    519 posts
    edited November 2013
    I'm waiting on the Who vs. Whom lesson. Is that next week?

    Yes, we'll be having that lesson right before double "less vs. fewer".
  • simbass7
    1928 posts
    edited November 2013
    zicoboo wrote:
    People who take grammar seriously on a worldwide forum used by people of all ages...
    tumblr_mh65i3evAK1r64ulno1_500.gif

    And nationalities

    It iz sooper somone finaly mantioned dis, bed gramar buggs me a lot
    Edit- a lot bit is correct so we're good here?
  • Pull_Up_A_Chair
    896 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    wikipedia wrote:
    In linguistics, grammar is the set of structural rules that governs the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. ....... The term grammar is often used by non-linguists with a very broad meaning.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammar

    And the net is full of "experts" claiming using the incorrect homophone is bad grammar. It is not, the word is placed in the correct manner in the sentence structure - it is just that it is spelt wrong for its intended meaning within that sentence. That is a spelling mistake and not a grammar mistake.

    Let the pseuds continue their pretensions.

    Once you start using punctuation and constructing strings of words, it becomes grammar unless it is strictly an error in spelling. Quoting from Wikapedia is not going to change this. An error within sentence structure such as "whats it to you?" Makes it a grammar issue because the word that is a combination of two words, what is - what's, is a contraction. You can call me all the names you would like but it does not change anything. Contractions are a grammar issue.

    Take the made up word "alot" - it could be argued that this is a misspelling. People spell what they hear. Does that make it strictly a spelling issue or, due to combining two words that will never, ever be a contraction, make it a grammar issue?

    You have a lot of nerve trying to defend your "reasoning" by assuming I am a fraud.

    If you can not argue without name calling, that makes you something less than credible.
  • Arlandria606
    519 posts
    edited November 2013
    If you can not argue without name calling, that makes you something less than credible.

    edward_scissorhands_yes.gif
  • CoffeeMars
    1058 posts
    edited November 2013
    Some work mates ordered Chinese food, saw this and chuckled a bit



    TjQDk4V.jpg

    Thought of your thread lol

    Cheers
  • zicoboo
    354 posts
    edited November 2013
    simbass7 wrote:
    zicoboo wrote:
    People who take grammar seriously on a worldwide forum used by people of all ages...
    tumblr_mh65i3evAK1r64ulno1_500.gif

    And nationalities

    It iz sooper somone finaly mantioned dis, bed gramar buggs me a lot
    Edit- a lot bit is correct so we're good here?

    I was including nationalities in the 'worldwide' part :P
  • adidas4fun68
    939 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    wikipedia wrote:
    In linguistics, grammar is the set of structural rules that governs the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. ....... The term grammar is often used by non-linguists with a very broad meaning.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammar

    And the net is full of "experts" claiming using the incorrect homophone is bad grammar. It is not, the word is placed in the correct manner in the sentence structure - it is just that it is spelt wrong for its intended meaning within that sentence. That is a spelling mistake and not a grammar mistake.

    Let the pseuds continue their pretensions.

    Once you start using punctuation and constructing strings of words, it becomes grammar unless it is strictly an error in spelling. Quoting from Wikapedia is not going to change this. An error within sentence structure such as "whats it to you?" Makes it a grammar issue because the word that is a combination of two words, what is - what's, is a contraction. You can call me all the names you would like but it does not change anything. Contractions are a grammar issue.

    Take the made up word "alot" - it could be argued that this is a misspelling. People spell what they hear. Does that make it strictly a spelling issue or, due to combining two words that will never, ever be a contraction, make it a grammar issue?

    You have a lot of nerve trying to defend your "reasoning" by assuming I am a fraud.

    If you can not argue without name calling, that makes you something less than credible.
    yes I get it, you are suffering an american folie ? plusieurs.

    Just because you think the "rules" you know are correct does not make it so.

    As for name calling, I did not quote you in my post and the "name calling" was thus not directed at you unless you want to make it so.
  • ecneralc
    3182 posts Member
    edited November 2013
    wikipedia wrote:
    In linguistics, grammar is the set of structural rules that governs the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. ....... The term grammar is often used by non-linguists with a very broad meaning.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammar

    And the net is full of "experts" claiming using the incorrect homophone is bad grammar. It is not, the word is placed in the correct manner in the sentence structure - it is just that it is spelt wrong for its intended meaning within that sentence. That is a spelling mistake and not a grammar mistake.

    Let the pseuds continue their pretensions.

    Once you start using punctuation and constructing strings of words, it becomes grammar unless it is strictly an error in spelling. Quoting from Wikapedia is not going to change this. An error within sentence structure such as "whats it to you?" Makes it a grammar issue because the word that is a combination of two words, what is - what's, is a contraction. You can call me all the names you would like but it does not change anything. Contractions are a grammar issue.

    Take the made up word "alot" - it could be argued that this is a misspelling. People spell what they hear. Does that make it strictly a spelling issue or, due to combining two words that will never, ever be a contraction, make it a grammar issue?

    You have a lot of nerve trying to defend your "reasoning" by assuming I am a fraud.

    If you can not argue without name calling, that makes you something less than credible.
    yes I get it, you are suffering an american folie ? plusieurs.

    Just because you think the "rules" you know are correct does not make it so.

    As for name calling, I did not quote you in my post and the "name calling" was thus not directed at you unless you want to make it so.

    For your example "whats it to you?", it could be that the person knows that there is suppose to be an '. They just were too lazy to switch between the letter keyboard to the symbols and punctuation keyboard. Laziness is not a good excuse, but everything now a days is about instant gratification. Also grammar and spelling are not a big deal to me. I make my fair share of spelling and grammar mistakes, especially if I'm typing fast and don't re-read what I wrote. I'm here to have fun looking at other people's towns.
  • zooter23
    116 posts
    edited November 2013
    I've found (and corrected) many of my own mistakes just by previewing posts before submitting them. Maybe we should be encouraging that.
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