EA Forums - Banner

**** Outbreak

Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.

Replies

  • urlaub694
    3608 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    That's pretty scary studd D:

    Here in Finland we had maybe our first natural disaster this week, a town was hit by over 100 lightnings.
  • SirLance_Elot
    2148 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    KrisV wrote:
    Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

    Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.
    \


    So you're fine with the CDC deciding to fly the two infected back to the States? I agree these viruses seem to be natural population control driven but still. To be hemorrhaging from every orifice of your body is no way to go.
  • KrisV
    1840 posts
    edited August 2014
    KrisV wrote:
    Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

    Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.
    \


    So you're fine with the CDC deciding to fly the two infected back to the States? I agree these viruses seem to be natural population control driven but still. To be hemorrhaging from every orifice of your body is no way to go.
    No they can fly them back to Africa.
  • SirLance_Elot
    2148 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    KrisV wrote:
    KrisV wrote:
    Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

    Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.
    \


    So you're fine with the CDC deciding to fly the two infected back to the States? I agree these viruses seem to be natural population control driven but still. To be hemorrhaging from every orifice of your body is no way to go.
    No they can fly them back to Africa.

    Agreed keep that * over there. I wasn't sure from your first post.
  • KrisV
    1840 posts
    edited August 2014
    KrisV wrote:
    KrisV wrote:
    Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

    Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.
    \


    So you're fine with the CDC deciding to fly the two infected back to the States? I agree these viruses seem to be natural population control driven but still. To be hemorrhaging from every orifice of your body is no way to go.
    No they can fly them back to Africa.

    Agreed keep that * over there. I wasn't sure from your first post.

    You said flying to US and I said fly their * back, not sure how that was confusing. :? I read about this last night.
  • empathy77
    4187 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    This is how post apocalyptic films start...........
  • durarararara
    2855 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    KrisV wrote:
    Anyone following the story of the **** outbreak in West Africa, pretty scary stuff. Its spread to some pretty major cities. Now they're flying two infected personnel to the CDC in America. This thing always has the potential to be a catastrophic outbreak when it pops up, but its never made it to large cities in the past and never has anyone infected been brought to America. Pretty scary stuff indeed.

    Yeah they can fly those 2 back for all I'm concern..this type of crap is how mass populations die.

    I'm actually surprised they're flying them back to the US. A lot of things can go wrong and an outbreak in the US can can happen, just like in the movie "Contagion."
  • MusicBooks960
    903 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Just going to throw this out here. All of what I'm about to type is based on various news articles I've read, so who honestly knows how much of it is entirely accurate. Here goes. The two infected people they are flying to the United States are U.S. citizens. They were in Liberia as caregivers to the infected. The U.S. Center for Disease Control is better prepared to try to help these people, since the situation where they are currently is dire. Both of these people's conditions are deteriorating. These people are fighting for their lives. One American has already died. While there is currently no cure or vaccine, one of the infected has already been given an experimental serum and a blood transfusion, and they plan to start testing an experimental vaccine as soon as September. They are being transported separately in a medical jet with an isolation pod. The director of the CDC says that an outbreak in the U.S. is unlikely, due to the fact that **** is not an airborne pathogen. The only thing I'm having trouble trying to wrap my head around is why one of them is apparently being taken to Emory University NEAR the headquarters of the CDC, rather than taking them both to the CDC straightaway. *Sources: CNN, NBC News, Wikipedia, even, for crying out loud.* Now I haven't seen "Contagion", but I have seen "12 Monkeys" and several of the Resident Evil movies. I've even read the unabridged version of "The Stand". It's still better to fight the war and potentially lose, than to do nothing at all. *Sources: Bruce Willis/Madeleine Stowe/Brad Pitt, Milla Jovovich, and Stephen King.* Edited for typo.
  • SirLance_Elot
    2148 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Just going to throw this out here. All of what I'm about to type is based on various news articles I've read, so who honestly knows how much of it is entirely accurate. Here goes. The two infected people they are flying to the United States are U.S. citizens. They were in Liberia as caregivers to the infected. The U.S. Center for Disease Control is better prepared to try to help these people, since the situation where they are currently is dire. Both of these people's conditions are deteriorating. These people are fighting for their lives. One American has already died. While there is currently no cure or vaccine, one of the infected has already been given an experimental serum and a blood transfusion, and they plan to start testing an experimental vaccine as soon as September. They are being transported separately in a medical jet with an isolation pod. The director of the CDC says that an outbreak in the U.S. is unlikely, due to the fact that **** is not an airborne pathogen. The only thing I'm having trouble trying to wrap my head around is why one of them is apparently being taken to Emory University NEAR the headquarters of the CDC, rather than taking them both to the CDC straightaway. *Sources: CNN, NBC News, Wikipedia, even, for crying out loud.* Now I haven't seen "Contagion", but I have seen "12 Monkeys" and several of the Resident Evil movies. I've even read the unabridged version of "The Stand". It's still better to fight the war and potentially lose, than to do nothing at all. *Sources: Bruce Willis/Madeleine Stowe/Brad Pitt, Milla Jovovich, and Stephen King.* Edited for typo.

    It just concerns me with the high mortality rate associated with ****, and how fast it can spread, yes it isn't an airborne pathogen but it still spreads like wildfire through close communities with people in contact with the infected. From a personal standpoint in regards to the CDC being better equipped for containing this thing I am optimistic but still wary. I work in a medical lab currently and even though we have thousands of pages of procedures for containing life treating samples accidents still happen. The CDC is better equipped than the stations if Africa yes, but there is still opportunity for human errors.
  • L_B_123XD
    1709 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Just so everyone knows **** isn't dangerous, well it is in terms of mortality rates but it isn't in terms of infection. **** can only be caught by contact with an infected persons bodily fluids, so these two people flying back to the USA are no risk so long as they don't bleed on someone. It isn't an airborne disease so it can't be passed on from them breathing or coughing Etc

    The only danger is if it mutated, which is certainly possible but Evola has existed for decades so for it to mutate into an airborne one now is very unlikely.
    Hopefully a vaccine can be made though because even if its better than other diseases to be on the rise( in terms of risk of a pandemic) it still isn't exactly welcome
  • MusicBooks960
    903 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Just going to throw this out here. All of what I'm about to type is based on various news articles I've read, so who honestly knows how much of it is entirely accurate. Here goes. The two infected people they are flying to the United States are U.S. citizens. They were in Liberia as caregivers to the infected. The U.S. Center for Disease Control is better prepared to try to help these people, since the situation where they are currently is dire. Both of these people's conditions are deteriorating. These people are fighting for their lives. One American has already died. While there is currently no cure or vaccine, one of the infected has already been given an experimental serum and a blood transfusion, and they plan to start testing an experimental vaccine as soon as September. They are being transported separately in a medical jet with an isolation pod. The director of the CDC says that an outbreak in the U.S. is unlikely, due to the fact that **** is not an airborne pathogen. The only thing I'm having trouble trying to wrap my head around is why one of them is apparently being taken to Emory University NEAR the headquarters of the CDC, rather than taking them both to the CDC straightaway. *Sources: CNN, NBC News, Wikipedia, even, for crying out loud.* Now I haven't seen "Contagion", but I have seen "12 Monkeys" and several of the Resident Evil movies. I've even read the unabridged version of "The Stand". It's still better to fight the war and potentially lose, than to do nothing at all. *Sources: Bruce Willis/Madeleine Stowe/Brad Pitt, Milla Jovovich, and Stephen King.* Edited for typo.

    It just concerns me with the high mortality rate associated with ****, and how fast it can spread, yes it isn't an airborne pathogen but it still spreads like wildfire through close communities with people in contact with the infected. From a personal standpoint in regards to the CDC being better equipped for containing this thing I am optimistic but still wary. I work in a medical lab currently and even though we have thousands of pages of procedures for containing life treating samples accidents still happen. The CDC is better equipped than the stations if Africa yes, but there is still opportunity for human errors.
    Too true. The potential for human error is always a factor. That's why I mentioned "The Stand". So is the potential for human maliciousness. That's why I mentioned "12 Monkeys" and the Resident Evil movies. What if some potentially genocidal lunatic with a vendetta against the human race were able to weaponize it? Hypothetically, all he would have to do is send one of his henchmen to West Africa and the deed could be done there. But what if the same hypothetical lunatic particularly had a grudge against the U.S.? A country where (correct me if what I read was wrong) **** has never been previously introduced? How much more difficulty would the hypothetical henchman encounter if both of the victims were at the CDC? Suffice to say, I'd feel much more comfortable if the infected were under the scrutiny and security of the CDC, rather than a university, no matter how well equipped (That's a very important distinction, I'm glad you pointed that out). There's something else that bothers me. As you so succinctly put it, **** already "spreads like wildfire", which makes me wonder what kind of effect a brand-new environment might have on it. It's already insane infectivity (let alone lethality) might be multiplied exponentially. *Shudder* It's difficult to say what the best course of action could be, since it seems there is little hope for any sort of resolution in Africa at least in the immediate future. Until there is, the infection will keep spreading. And killing.
  • Indigofabian
    155 posts
    edited August 2014
    Um, "insane infectivity", what? It isn't airborne, it relies on an exchange of body fluids. That's why so many people who have caught it are healthcare workers and people in rural communities (where general hygiene standards are lower). That, coupled with the high and rapid fatality rate actually means this isn't a threat at all to most countries. It's terrible that so many people are dying in Afica and more support must be given to help them deal with the current outbreak but any suggestion that it would spread over here is not only ridiculous but downright silly, albeit potentially dangerous if people start to panic.
  • MusicBooks960
    903 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Um, "insane infectivity", what? It isn't airborne, it relies on an exchange of body fluids. That's why so many people who have caught it are healthcare workers and people in rural communities (where general hygiene standards are lower). That, coupled with the high and rapid fatality rate actually means this isn't a threat at all to most countries. It's terrible that so many people are dying in Afica and more support must be given to help them deal with the current outbreak but any suggestion that it would spread over here is not only ridiculous but downright silly, albeit potentially dangerous if people start to panic.
    The World Health Organization estimates 1,323 cases in the last five months. In four countries. I mentioned in my first post the fact that it's not airborne, but that is of little concern to a virus that spreads through transmission of bodily fluids on a continent that is known for heat and less access to facilities to ensure proper hygiene and heath. If you had read the entirety of my posts, you would understand the illogical concerns as well as the logical concerns. I don't like to believe any maniac would actually be able to use such a lethal pathogen for destructive purposes, but there have also been an estimated 729 deaths. There is no cure, but they are hoping to test an experimental vaccine. Two American citizens are being taken back to their home country, which according to what I read, has never before been introduced to **** firsthand. I think the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. is probably safe enough, But supposedly they are also taking one victim to a university NEAR the CDC. All it would take is one hiccup, and a previously unencountered virus would be at large in a major American city. A hot, humid, major American city. But it's not even the first-world countries that pose the problem. I'm not wandering the streets with a "The End is Near" sign, I'm just pointing out that the possibility of transmission remains through blood or other bodily fluids or contact with infected animals or corpses. One of the articles I read implied that they had essentially put a cap on new cases. I would like to believe that. But unfortunately, I also believe it is more likely that the U.S. will have minimal trouble dealing with it there, and the problem will persist at the source. The term "insane infectivity" I used is significantly more relevant to the countries that are suffering these problems or the possibility of the virus thriving and/or mutating in a new environment. Over 1300 dead over there. That's about 260 people a month. Practically infinitesimal compared to a 60%+ mortality rate. In currently four countries. I sincerely hope that it's not as infectious over there as it seems, and that they have actually brought the spread of infection to a standstill.
  • Mopurglar
    1048 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    I'll be honest, I don't think these patients coming to the US is as big a deal as it's being made out to be. **** is deadly but not as contagious as something like a respiratory virus. Even when outbreaks occur in Africa, historically, they've gone away with normal quarantine / isolation practices and have been mostly felt in rural areas that lacked the infrastructure to control it. Notice how quickly Nigeria responded to its first-ever case after an infected Liberian flew to Lagos 2 weeks ago.
    The only thing I'm having trouble trying to wrap my head around is why one of them is apparently being taken to Emory University NEAR the headquarters of the CDC, rather than taking them both to the CDC straightaway.
    One of the infected is not just going to Emory University, he/she is going to a highly specialized isolation unit at Emory University Hospital that was built in collaboration with the CDC and is separate from other patient care areas. It is one of 4 such units in the United States.

    I wouldn't make much out of the distinction that the facility is a hospital rather than the CDC's own building. The patient clearly needed to be hospitalized -- that's why he/she is not simply going to some quarantine chamber in a government building. **** is so deadly in part because most **** infections occur in impoverished areas that lack modern medical facilities. An infected patient is less likely to die if he gets aggressive medical treatment. This means hospitalization, when needed.

    Now, could they get appropriate treatment in a Liberian hospital? Probably, but if they are being brought back, we might as well do everything we can to save them. One of them is a doctor who actually flew to Africa to treat **** victims, and the other is a missionary.
  • MusicBooks960
    903 posts Member
    edited August 2014
    Mopurglar wrote:
    I'll be honest, I don't think these patients coming to the US is as big a deal as it's being made out to be. **** is deadly but not as contagious as something like a respiratory virus. Even when outbreaks occur in Africa, they go away with normal quarantine / isolation practices and are mostly felt in rural areas that lack the infrastructure to control it. Notice how quickly Nigeria responded to its first-ever case after an infected Liberian flew to Lagos 2 weeks ago.
    The only thing I'm having trouble trying to wrap my head around is why one of them is apparently being taken to Emory University NEAR the headquarters of the CDC, rather than taking them both to the CDC straightaway.
    One of the infected is not just going to Emory University, he/she is going to a highly specialized isolation unit at Emory University Hospital that was built in collaboration with the CDC and is separate from other patient care areas. It is one of 4 such units in the United States.

    I wouldn't make much out of the distinction that the facility is a hospital rather than the CDC's own building. The patient clearly needed to be hospitalized -- that's why he/she is not simply going to some quarantine chamber in a government building. **** is so deadly in part because most **** infections occur in impoverished areas that lack modern medical facilities. An infected patient is less likely to die if he gets aggressive medical treatment. This means hospitalization, when needed.

    Now, could they get appropriate treatment in a Liberian hospital? Probably, but if they are being brought back, we might as well do everything we can to save them. One of them is a doctor who actually flew to Africa to treat **** victims, and the other is a missionary.
    Thank you for clarifying that for me. I possibly just didn't dig deep enough, but the articles I read seemed to either have very little information on that situation themselves, or they were for whatever reason trying to keep it under wraps. I find it comforting in and of itself that it is a university HOSPITAL, which none of the articles I read managed to specify. I did pick up on the fact that one of them was a doctor, and if what I remember reading in one of the articles was correct, I believe he insisted that the experimental serum that I mentioned in my first post be administered to his colleague. Upon rereading that article, he insisted she have the single available dose of serum, while it was he who had the blood transfusion. Once again here's to hoping they have effectively stopped new cases of infection, and even more that they will find a vaccine and/or cure quickly. Every few years, it rears it's ugly head and kills people until they get it under control. Maybe they will be able to stomp it out, once and for all, this time.
This discussion has been closed.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!