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Nuked by my toddler today

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  • johncolombo
    11603 posts Senior Moderator
    edited January 2015
    News flash, folks. Much as we like to think parents know what we're doing ... We're winging it. It's terrifying when we first realize it. (I, for one, had always assumed my parents knew what they were doing). Best just to go along for the ride.

    We need a"dumbest thing I've ever done as a parent" contest.

    I'll go first.

    In 1983, when our kids were little (ages 3, 5 and 6) I bribed them on Halloween. (Mother-of-the-Year I ain't.) I told them that if I didn't have to make costumes and go Trick-or-Treating with them, I would give each of them money to go buy whatever candy they wanted the next day. We negotiated a while, and settled on a buy-off of $5 per kid. I figured we'd go to the store the next day, they'd each buy a big bag of Halloween candy and everyone would be happy. Got to the store and there was a "sales spectacular!" ... Full-sized candy bars were five-for-a-dollar. Three Musketeers, Milky Ways, Almond Joys, etc. To this day, they reminisce fondly about it: " Remember that time Mom bought us the seventy-five candy bars?"

    8)

    Love!
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  • bren1960
    1631 posts
    edited January 2015
    I have 8 kids. One day my brother in law comes storming in my house asking me if I knew what jamokes my kids were. Apparently my 7 yr & 6 yr old decided it would be faster to ride their bikes on the freeway. Now my children have been told never to do that. But...I can only hope & pray that something I say sticks in their heads. These same two wonderful children had been taken to watch their older sister play volleyball. They went to get a drink & the police came asking who these two children belong to. Apparently they dialed 911. When asked why, they said because the sign said it was a free call. Now looking at my grandchildren & what they can do with technology...we will never be truly safe.
  • 4junk3000
    6210 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    bren1960 wrote:
    I have 8 kids. .
    Omg this explains much

    OP mentioned that she was sitting reading a book, with the 2-year old in her lap, playing with the device. I agree with your overall premise, and I know you specified that you were generalizing. Your statement that you didn't know what her circumstances were led me to think you missed her description in her later post.

    BTW, I saw a kid riding a bike the other day. Haven't seen a kid riding a bike in ages. Reminder me of when I was a little kid and on Saturday mornings my parents would say "go find someone to play with" and we kids would spend the day God knows where doing God knows what with God knows who. We knew that when it got dark, we had to go home for dinner. And we'd spend all day having a blast, making up our own things to do. It's a wonder any of us survived. But we had to be creative, and nobody intervened. :)

    - yeah if I read about sitting in laps I forgot it by the time I was typing. But heck, I've had kids rip glasses right off my face and break'em, how did I not stop that? Kids definitely get into things. I trust them as far as I can throw 'em. But that's only because I don't want to get caught giving them enough rope to hang themselves. Not on my watch.

    And I definitely remember being forced out of the house and expected back at dusk. That was when kids on a milk carton was not taken as the norm, no one shot up schools for attention, and they didn't issue brain drugs for rambunctious behavior, they made you pick out the stick they were going to beat you with.

    All my designs look unfinished because i can't place as many plants, streetlights, and fences as i would like. PLEASE REMOVE THE LIMIT, EA!
  • annettemarc
    7747 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    bren1960 wrote:
    I have 8 kids. One day my brother in law comes storming in my house asking me if I knew what jamokes my kids were. Apparently my 7 yr & 6 yr old decided it would be faster to ride their bikes on the freeway. Now my children have been told never to do that. But...I can only hope & pray that something I say sticks in their heads. These same two wonderful children had been taken to watch their older sister play volleyball. They went to get a drink & the police came asking who these two children belong to. Apparently they dialed 911. When asked why, they said because the sign said it was a free call. Now looking at my grandchildren & what they can do with technology...we will never be truly safe.

    :lol::lol::lol:

    USA/UK Race To Throw Country Into Utter Chaos = TOO CLOSE TO CALL
  • drumnman
    1475 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    News flash, folks. Much as we like to think parents know what we're doing ... We're winging it. It's terrifying when we first realize it. (I, for one, had always assumed my parents knew what they were doing). Best just to go along for the ride.

    We need a"dumbest thing I've ever done as a parent" contest.

    I'll go first.

    In 1983, when our kids were little (ages 3, 5 and 6) I bribed them on Halloween. (Mother-of-the-Year I ain't.) I told them that if I didn't have to make costumes and go Trick-or-Treating with them, I would give each of them money to go buy whatever candy they wanted the next day. We negotiated a while, and settled on a buy-off of $5 per kid. I figured we'd go to the store the next day, they'd each buy a big bag of Halloween candy and everyone would be happy. Got to the store and there was a "sales spectacular!" ... Full-sized candy bars were five-for-a-dollar. Three Musketeers, Milky Ways, Almond Joys, etc. To this day, they reminisce fondly about it: " Remember that time Mom bought us the seventy-five candy bars?"

    8)

    This was so funny I just shared it with Mrs. Drumnman! Lol!
  • roshigoth1
    1601 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    In 1983, when our kids were little (ages 3, 5 and 6) I bribed them on Halloween. (Mother-of-the-Year I ain't.) I told them that if I didn't have to make costumes and go Trick-or-Treating with them, I would give each of them money to go buy whatever candy they wanted the next day. We negotiated a while, and settled on a buy-off of $5 per kid. I figured we'd go to the store the next day, they'd each buy a big bag of Halloween candy and everyone would be happy. Got to the store and there was a "sales spectacular!" ... Full-sized candy bars were five-for-a-dollar. Three Musketeers, Milky Ways, Almond Joys, etc. To this day, they reminisce fondly about it: " Remember that time Mom bought us the seventy-five candy bars?"

    8)

    Sounds like a win-win. You had an easier (and cheaper) Halloween, and they got more than they otherwise would have. :mrgreen:

    Of course, they probably got way more than was good for them...
  • cjryder625
    1426 posts Member
    edited January 2015

    So, it's just crazy sometimes for me to think that I now can sit down and chat about how my two year old got into my game, which is hosted I-don't-even-know-where, and played by people all over the world, and laugh about how he has enough ability as a toddler to move all my pixels from one place to another without me knowing.

    Future shock.

    When my son was 2, he fed a sandwich to the VCR and tried to microwave his shoes :-) He started playing on the computer with Windows 3.1 on it...

    At least he has his own iPad now, LOL!

    :lol::lol:

    Our gas oven used to have the broiler section in a bottom pull-out "drawer". When our son was about 3, thats where he hid them from his sister, and forgot. Your shoes-in-the-microwave incident seems MUCH more exciting. :)

    my youngest sons favourite pastime when he was small was blowing up tomatoes and eggs in the microwave. That was the days when microwaves were new.
    I love my computer...all my friends live in it
  • annettemarc
    7747 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    4junk3000 wrote:
    And I definitely remember being forced out of the house and expected back at dusk. That was when kids on a milk carton was not taken as the norm, no one shot up schools for attention, and they didn't issue brain drugs for rambunctious behavior, they made you pick out the stick they were going to beat you with.

    Do a bit of research on the "milk carton" phenomenon. It was started by the Etan Patz case. (A stereotypical stranger-abduction case.). Then, an advocacy group of mothers whose husbands with noncustodial rights promoted the use of milk cartons to retrieve their children.

    The media is a for-profit industry. Their coverage breeds hysterics in parents who perceive their children are in danger. Melodrama sells advertising space. In 1999, for instance, there were 70 million "children" in the USA. 33% of that group (23 million) were ages 0 - 5 years. There were 20 stereotypical kidnappings in that year, of that age group. In the same year, 34% of "children" (24 million) were ages 6 - 11. There were 24 stereotypical kidnappings that year, of that age group. One in a million. Yet, children are raised to believe the world is full of evil strangers around every corner. Ptui.

    Your comment about medications plays to the same sort of misinformation regarding the facts. If I am not diabetic and take insulin, I will have a negative reaction. Many Diabetics need Insulin. If I do not have cardiac problems and take heart medication, I will have a negative reaction. Many people DO have cardiac problems, and need medication. If my vision is perfect and I put on strong prescription eyeglasses, I wont be able to see. Many people have POOR vision and need glasses. If a NON-ADD child (one who is healthy and "rambunctious") is given Ritalin, they will be bouncing off the ceiling. Many children DO have ADD. Ritalin calms them down. That's right. Speed calms THEM down.

    A parent or teacher who gives Ritalin to a healthy rambunctious child ends up with a hyped-up kid. Nobody would want to make their life MORE difficult. The public perception that giving a classroom of normal kids SPEED will make a teacher's life easier is just plain ludicrous.

    If my kid has horrible vision and I neglect to do whatever I can afford to help him, so he can read and learn with his peers, I'm a crappy parent. If my kid has ADD and i refuse to help him so he can read and learn with his peers, I'm a crappy parent.

    /end rant

    USA/UK Race To Throw Country Into Utter Chaos = TOO CLOSE TO CALL
  • hipmama197190
    288 posts
    edited January 2015
    This thread has gotten really interesting while I was out trying to fix my town. So many laughs, and a few scares, and a lot of thinking going on.

    I wanted to make sure that no one thought I was angry with my son, I know a mom-error when I see one! I was just fascinated at how much life has changed since my parents (or even myself with my older kids) would let babies play with car keys or a makeup mirror from mom's purse to keep them busy.

    I have 5 kids, who are 19, 17, 17, 13 and then the 2 year old (why yes, we were quite surprised, but in a happy way.) I've homeschool them all, and for 12 years I ran a local homeschool support group that I started. My oldest has graduated and is in college, and the twins are on track to graduate in the next couple of months and start college classes in the fall. So, on the one hand I can say I'm a pretty decent mom at making sure they're challenged and motivated. At the same time, I'd be a big fat liar if I said I was a super awesome mom with a tribe full of geniuses under my roof, because if I did I would have to hope I never met any of you in person or you'd learn what a bunch of goofy dorks we are!

    So, I don't blame people for saying that I should have done something differently. If the stakes were higher, I would have. If he had been digging in something like the medicine chest, I would have locked that stuff up the first time I saw him anywhere near it. (That was just an example, the medicine chest is already locked up.)

    No worries, I'm getting everything dug out, and trying to get out and visit people.

    Someone asked if nuking just puts everything into storage, or if you lose things. I haven't noticed anything missing. The biggest pain to me has been that the storage menus are much better than they used to be (when everything was one huge jumble) but it's still difficult to locate some things quickly. Buildings and characters are pretty straightforward, but it can take a lot of scrolling to find a Burning Bush or Recycled Tower. I've decided not to try to find specific things to place now that the big stuff is out, and I'm just sort of lackadaisically scrolling through storage and taking things out as they catch my eye.

  • Helen0725
    553 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    4junk3000 wrote:
    And I definitely remember being forced out of the house and expected back at dusk. That was when kids on a milk carton was not taken as the norm, no one shot up schools for attention, and they didn't issue brain drugs for rambunctious behavior, they made you pick out the stick they were going to beat you with.

    Do a bit of research on the "milk carton" phenomenon. It was started by the Etan Patz case. (A stereotypical stranger-abduction case.). Then, an advocacy group of mothers whose husbands with noncustodial rights promoted the use of milk cartons to retrieve their children.

    The media is a for-profit industry. Their coverage breeds hysterics in parents who perceive their children are in danger. Melodrama sells advertising space. In 1999, for instance, there were 70 million "children" in the USA. 33% of that group (23 million) were ages 0 - 5 years. There were 20 stereotypical kidnappings in that year, of that age group. In the same year, 34% of "children" (24 million) were ages 6 - 11. There were 24 stereotypical kidnappings that year, of that age group. One in a million. Yet, children are raised to believe the world is full of evil strangers around every corner. Ptui.

    Your comment about medications plays to the same sort of misinformation regarding the facts. If I am not diabetic and take insulin, I will have a negative reaction. Many Diabetics need Insulin. If I do not have cardiac problems and take heart medication, I will have a negative reaction. Many people DO have cardiac problems, and need medication. If my vision is perfect and I put on strong prescription eyeglasses, I wont be able to see. Many people have POOR vision and need glasses. If a NON-ADD child (one who is healthy and "rambunctious") is given Ritalin, they will be bouncing off the ceiling. Many children DO have ADD. Ritalin calms them down. That's right. Speed calms THEM down.

    A parent or teacher who gives Ritalin to a healthy rambunctious child ends up with a hyped-up kid. Nobody would want to make their life MORE difficult. The public perception that giving a classroom of normal kids SPEED will make a teacher's life easier is just plain ludicrous.

    If my kid has horrible vision and I neglect to do whatever I can afford to help him, so he can read and learn with his peers, I'm a crappy parent. If my kid has ADD and i refuse to help him so he can read and learn with his peers, I'm a crappy parent.

    /end rant

    I applaud you for your comment, Annette:) My son has ADHD and ODD (Oppositional Defiant Disorder). It took a long time to convince my mother-in-law that my son needs his medication in order to function and go about his day without being distracted.
    But one day, she was looking after him for the whole day and it was towards the end of the day when she had run out of his afternoon meds. He was acting out and giving her a hard time when it was time to eat dinner. When we picked him up that night to go home, my mother-in-law said "Can you please not forget his medication next time! We had such a time trying to get him to behave!!"

    My point is that people who say that ADD or ADHD or any other condition is just something that doctors make up to label over-active kids are most certainly misinformed. They need to spend a day with the child to realize what we go through each day.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • 4junk3000
    6210 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    Idk what you're getting at with "research" and "misinformation".

    Once upon a time, missing children were rare and quite alarming. The image on the milk carton was disturbing. Since then, missing kids are now viewed as just another daily occurrence. And now milk labels are more concerned with the depressing image affecting sales than helping find them.

    And I'm not disputing ADHD exists for some kids.

    But i don't remember ADD being such a problem before Ritalin. My parents did not take any kids to a doctor when we didn't listen. We got punished and learned the consequences of our actions. I don't remember classrooms being jungles before Ritalin. Somehow teachers got kids to listen and learn.

    I don't remember many problems being SO widespread before pharmaceuticals ramped up efforts to over medicate the population with magic (patented) pills.



    All my designs look unfinished because i can't place as many plants, streetlights, and fences as i would like. PLEASE REMOVE THE LIMIT, EA!
  • 4junk3000
    6210 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    Helen0725 wrote:
    I applaud you for your comment;

    My point is that people who say that ADD or ADHD or any other condition is just something that doctors make up to label over-active kids are most certainly misinformed. They need to spend a day with the child to realize what we go through each day.

    I sure hope you're not implying that's what I said, because it certainly was not. What I was suggesting is that when I was hyperactive, I was required to stand in a corner until I calmed down. And if I didn't, I got increasing punishments until I learned who was in charge: not me.

    But valid cases of ADD does not negate the fact that many children are not receiving the guidance and discipline they require to learn to manage their own lives and develop into an adult. Too many are instead taken for treatment, given something that modifies their brain for them so they don't have to learn to do it themselves.

    Don't even try to suggest there aren't parents taking the easy way out, or Doctors that wouldn't write Rxs just to placate the paying customer and submit the insurance claim, or kids that aren't being neglected. This is not one in a million either.

    Maybe this is a personal subject for you, but don't make the mistake of defending the guilty while stating your own innocence.
    And your mother was dealing with a child exhibiting symptoms of withdrawal. This had nothing to do with whether he should have been on it to begin with, which I'm also not disputing. Just don't cite it as evidence.

    I can't continue this here. It's definitely not game discussion. Move to OT and we can chat more, but I don't want to hijack this thread.

    All my designs look unfinished because i can't place as many plants, streetlights, and fences as i would like. PLEASE REMOVE THE LIMIT, EA!
  • Helen0725
    553 posts Member
    edited January 2015
    [/quote]

    "I sure hope you're not implying that's what I said, because it certainly was not. What I was suggesting is that when I was hyperactive, I was required to stand in a corner until I calmed down. And if I didn't, I got increasing punishments until I learned who was in charge: not me.

    But valid cases of ADD does not negate the fact that many children are not receiving the guidance and discipline they require to learn to manage their own lives and develop into an adult. Too many are instead taken for treatment, given something that modifies their brain for them so they don't have to learn to do it themselves.

    Don't even try to suggest there aren't parents taking the easy way out, or Doctors that wouldn't write Rxs just to placate the paying customer and submit the insurance claim, or kids that aren't being neglected. This is not one in a million either.

    Maybe this is a personal subject for you, but don't make the mistake of defending the guilty while stating your own innocence.
    And your mother was dealing with a child exhibiting symptoms of withdrawal. This had nothing to do with whether he should have been on it to begin with, which I'm also not disputing. Just don't cite it as evidence.

    I can't continue this here. It's definitely not game discussion. Move to OT and we can chat more, but I don't want to hijack this thread.

    [/quote]"

    I was not being critical with your point of view or with what you said. Nor was my opinion aimed at you. I was merely sharing what we go through day to day with my almost 12 year old son who has ADHD. I certainly do not think of myself as an expert on the subject and I was not defending anyone. And please don't suggest you know what my son has or doesn't have. His medication does not alter his brain, it just makes him think clearer. We don't just give my son medication. He also has an ADHD coach who teaches him how to deal with situations as he gets older. The school counselor also checks in on him from time to time so that they can discuss how things are going.

    I won't say anything further as I also don't wish to hi-jack this thread.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • johncolombo
    11603 posts Senior Moderator
    edited January 2015

    So, it's just crazy sometimes for me to think that I now can sit down and chat about how my two year old got into my game, which is hosted I-don't-even-know-where, and played by people all over the world, and laugh about how he has enough ability as a toddler to move all my pixels from one place to another without me knowing.

    Future shock.

    When my son was 2, he fed a sandwich to the VCR and tried to microwave his shoes :-) He started playing on the computer with Windows 3.1 on it...

    At least he has his own iPad now, LOL!

    :lol::lol:

    Our gas oven used to have the broiler section in a bottom pull-out "drawer". When our son was about 3, thats where he hid them from his sister, and forgot. Your shoes-in-the-microwave incident seems MUCH more exciting. :)

    OMG thanks for the laugh
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