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Can anyone Spanish help me?

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juliet603
17888 posts Member
Hola! I'm from Peru, it doesn't actually matter if you pronounce y's and ll's equally, because when you speak it it sounds THE SAME. Trust me.

By the way, anyone from Latin America can speak fluent spanish as someone from Spain, the difference is in some words that come from the different cultures but are only spoken on our country. Other thing that is different from each country is the 'way' we say things (it's call "dejo") not necessarily the pronunciation.

Hope this helps.

Replies

  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    Explaining pronunciation here is difficult and I'm not good at English phonetics.

    I don't agree with Patty. There is actually a difference between 'y' and 'll' but the best way to learn it is to listen to the words a lot of times and repeat them. It's true that we talk without noticing the difference and many times people pronounce 'y' as 'll' (not the other way) but if someone pronounces tortilla or paella with 'y', I'm sure we'll notice.
    Don't worry about it because people will understand you anyway but if you want to pronounce them properly, there's a page called wordreference where you can listen to the words. And I think google translator has that feature too.
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Thanks for the help! :-) Most websites I've looked at give different advice but everyone seems to agree that it doesn't really matter because whichever we say it will be understood, and you two have both said that too so that's good! :D

    I took a look at wordreference and they seemed to say the ll words the same way I've heard them before, but it pronounced 'yo' differently to how I'd been taught.

    To be honest English people are so terrible at bothering to learn other languages that I think anyone I tried to speak to in Spanish would be shocked that I was even trying lol!

    By the way is it ok if I keep bumping this thread up every time I need some help? It's really useful having native speaking people to ask :)

    One more question I had was, I know 'De nada' is used as a way of saying "you're welcome" as in "it's nothing / no worries" when someone says thank you, but could it also be used if someone said sorry? Like if someone bumped into me and said sorry, could I say "de nada" or would it not make sense like that?
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    "De nada" is the same as "you're welcome" and it's only used after thank you/gracias. If someone says sorry and you want to say that there's no problem, you can say "no pasa nada", "no es/ha sido nada" or just "nada". The last one is used mainly in the street, when you're in a hurry.
    Saying "de nada" after "sorry" makes no sense.
    "No es nada" or "no ha sido nada" are used as "de nada" specially when someone says thank you because you have done something for him/her or have given him/her a present. For example, if you say "gracias" to a waiter, he'll say "de nada" and not the other expressions.

    I'm sometimes really bad at explaining things so ask all you need as many times as you want if I haven't explained it clearly. And of course you can bump this thread every time to need something :wink:
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    "De nada" is the same as "you're welcome" and it's only used after thank you/gracias. If someone says sorry and you want to say that there's no problem, you can say "no pasa nada", "no es/ha sido nada" or just "nada". The last one is used mainly in the street, when you're in a hurry.
    Saying "de nada" after "sorry" makes no sense.
    "No es nada" or "no ha sido nada" are used as "de nada" specially when someone says thank you because you have done something for him/her or have given him/her a present. For example, if you say "gracias" to a waiter, he'll say "de nada" and not the other expressions.

    I'm sometimes really bad at explaining things so ask all you need as many times as you want if I haven't explained it clearly. And of course you can bump this thread every time to need something :wink:

    Thanks for the info! I'm sure I would have been taught that eventually but I get impatient :P now I know not to say de nada for anything except you're welcome... Unless I want people to look at me like I'm crazy! :lol:
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?
  • mr_skeltal_80
    18123 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Los-Pollos-Hermanos.jpg

    Sorry.... couldnt resist. :mrgreen:
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?

    Haha yeah a lot of London people are rude anyway, they wouldn't notice! :lol:

    The Y is one of the things that's confusing us, some people say to pronounce it as English people say a 'y' but others say to pronounce it as we would a 'J'! :?
  • Itchem-Scratchem
    1338 posts
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?
    Y is E,
    LL is SH,
    I is E,
    E is I
    J is HEH
    ? is (it's to hard to explain by typing)

    This is 100% accurate for European and South American spanish, trust me I'm half Argentinian.
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?
    Y is E

    I think she means in a word, I could be wrong though!
  • Itchem-Scratchem
    1338 posts
    edited June 2014
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?
    Y is E

    I think she means in a word, I could be wrong though!
    The word Y is pronounced E
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    De nada :P
    Sometimes we learn a lot about grammar and vocabulary and nothing about this kind of useful things. I've just realised that I've never learned what to say if someone says sorry :?

    I've been thinking about the difference between "ll" and "y" and there are two words ("pollo" and "poyo" ) that you can use to listen to that difference.

    You mean what to say in English if someone says sorry? Just "it's ok" or "no problem" would be fine! Unless you don't forgive them of course, then you just give them an evil look :twisted:

    I listened to some people saying pollo and poyo and I couldn't tell the difference lol :?
    When I was in London nobody looked at my face when they said sorry, so they couldn't see my evil look :mrgreen:

    Do you know how to pronounce "y" in Spanish?
    Y is E,
    LL is SH,
    I is E,
    E is I
    J is HEH
    ? is (it's to hard to explain by typing)

    This is 100% accurate for European and South American spanish, trust me I'm half Argentinian.

    I don't know about the others but the LL sounding like SH is just an Argentinian thing according to my tutor and a lot of people online. I want to know the pronunciations they use in Spain as that's where I go on holiday a lot and where I hope to move to one day.
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    I meant "y" as a word because words with that letter keep that sound ("e" according to you both) and that could be the main difference between "y" and "ll".

    When you talk about "sh", do you mean like in "she" for example?
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    I meant "y" as a word because words with that letter keep that sound ("e" according to you both) and that could be the main difference between "y" and "ll".

    When you talk about "sh", do you mean like in "she" for example?

    Yes like "she"

    I wish there was some way I could hear you so I knew what you meant lol! I listened "pollo" and "poyo" said by several different people online but they just sounded the same to me! :(

    Are there any other words with 'y' in that you can recommend that I listen to to see if I can hear it?
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    I meant "y" as a word because words with that letter keep that sound ("e" according to you both) and that could be the main difference between "y" and "ll".

    When you talk about "sh", do you mean like in "she" for example?

    Yes like "she"

    I wish there was some way I could hear you so I knew what you meant lol! I listened "pollo" and "poyo" said by several different people online but they just sounded the same to me! :(

    Are there any other words with 'y' in that you can recommend that I listen to to see if I can hear it?

    That sounds Argentinian to me but everyone will understand you so use that pronounciation if it's easier for you.

    There are a lot of words with "y" but not many that exist with "ll" too, just "pollo"/"poyo" and "halla"/"haya".
    I don't know how much have you learnt by now but you must have in mind that "y" is not pronounced always the same way.
    - Just "y" means "and" and is pronounced "e".
    - "Y" at the end of the word is pronounced "e" too. Examples: "hoy", "voy", "soy", "hay", "jersey",...
    - Words that start with "Y" o containing "y": "yo", "playa", "boya", "yerno", "hoyo", "yate", "yema",... The pronounciation is similar to "ll" but they keep the "e" sound.

    I think that "ll" is similar to "j" and "y" is like your "y".
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    juliet603 wrote:
    Nilmade wrote:
    I meant "y" as a word because words with that letter keep that sound ("e" according to you both) and that could be the main difference between "y" and "ll".

    When you talk about "sh", do you mean like in "she" for example?

    Yes like "she"

    I wish there was some way I could hear you so I knew what you meant lol! I listened "pollo" and "poyo" said by several different people online but they just sounded the same to me! :(

    Are there any other words with 'y' in that you can recommend that I listen to to see if I can hear it?

    That sounds Argentinian to me but everyone will understand you so use that pronounciation if it's easier for you.

    There are a lot of words with "y" but not many that exist with "ll" too, just "pollo"/"poyo" and "halla"/"haya".
    I don't know how much have you learnt by now but you must have in mind that "y" is not pronounced always the same way.
    - Just "y" means "and" and is pronounced "e".
    - "Y" at the end of the word is pronounced "e" too. Examples: "hoy", "voy", "soy", "hay", "jersey",...
    - Words that start with "Y" o containing "y": "yo", "playa", "boya", "yerno", "hoyo", "yate", "yema",... The pronounciation is similar to "ll" but they keep the "e" sound.

    I think that "ll" is similar to "j" and "y" is like your "y".

    Thanks! That's set my mind at ease because it sounds like I've had it right, it's just the tutor confused me when he started saying ella in two different ways in one lesson, but I think maybe he just messed up :lol:

    I've only had three short 10-15 minute lessons so I haven't learnt much at all, just the basics like greetings, he/she/I etc. Just the boring stuff so far!
  • Nilmade
    1028 posts
    edited June 2014
    You'll miss that stuff when you start learning grammar :P
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Nilmade wrote:
    You'll miss that stuff when you start learning grammar :P

    I'm hoping since I'm only having Spanish speaking lessons I won't have to worry about that :lol:
  • juliet603
    17888 posts Member
    edited June 2014
    Last night we were learning ser and they told us "I am" is 'Yo Soy', but I've seen it just written as soy without the 'Yo' before, like if I type into Google Translate "I Am Spanish" it says it's "Soy espa?ol".

    So do you not always need to put the 'Yo' first?
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